Hancock, Chad

Nutrition, Dietetics & Food Science

Email: 4glehclergsgoDf}y2ihy  (Email Form)

Website: http://lifesciences.byu.edu/old/FacStaff/default.aspx?ID=327

S245  ESC
Provo, UT 84602
(801) 422-7588

Associate Professor

 Research Interests
My research focus is on metabolic pathways impacted by changes in energy supply and demands. Factors that contribute to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are most often a result of a mismatch between metabolic fuel supply (the food energy that we eat) and metabolic fuel demands (the food and stored energy that we burn through activity). We study energy metabolism and the development of insulin resistance using nutritional, exercise and pharmaceutical approaches.
Our general research objectives include the following:
• Understand mechanisms by which lifestyle and other factors contribute to the development of insulin resistance.
• Investigate the effects of different bioactive compounds on glucose management and energy metabolism.
• Explore mechanisms by which various bioactive compounds impact glucose management and energy metabolism.
This research is vitally important to gain a better understanding of the metabolic problems of insulin resistance and diabetes, which continues to affect more and more people every year. We expect our work can lead to improved prevention and therapy for diabetes and related disease conditions.
Recent projects of interest include:
• A study looking at the effect of dietary selenium and/or increased isoflavones on insulin resistance and baseline glucose management.
• A study examining the effect of caloric restriction on mitochondrial content.
• A study examining the effect of iron deficiency and specific enzymatic responses to this energy challenge.
• A study examining the effect of high fat diets as well as the activation of a critical enzyme involved in energy sensing (AMPK) on muscle mitochondrial content and capacity.
• A study looking at the effect of high fat diets and activating AMPK on liver fat accumulation.
Current projects of interest include:
• Examining a potential role of elevated cellular iron in the development of insulin resistance.
o Exploring the effects of specific bioactive compounds on muscle iron metabolism and the development of insulin resistance.
• We are examining the possibility that some anti-diabetic therapies may be effective at reducing unwanted toxicities associated with certain chemotherapeutic treatments.
 Experience

Academic - Post-Secondary
  • Associate Professor, NDFS, 2014-Present

Professional
  • Assistant Professor, NDFS, 2008-2014
  • Instructor-Nutrition and Dietetics, St. Louis University-Doisy College of Health Sciences, 2008-2008
  • Editorial Board Member, American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 2007-2008
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Washington University in St. Louis-School of Medicine, 2005-2008

 Memberships
  • American Diabetes Association, 2008-Present
  • The American Physiological Society, 2008-Present
 Courses Taught

Fall 2016
  • NDFS 310: Nutr & Metab Sports Exercise Section 001
  • NDFS 494R: Undergrad Research in N D F S Section 005
  • NDFS 601: Advanced Human Nutrition 1 Section 001
  • NDFS 691R: Graduate Seminar Section 001
Summer 2016
  • NDFS 691R: Graduate Seminar Section 001
Spring 2016
  • NDFS 310: Nutr & Metab Sports Exercise Section 001
  • NDFS 691R: Graduate Seminar Section 001
Winter 2016
  • NDFS 100: Essentials of Human Nutrition Section 003
  • NDFS 310: Nutr & Metab Sports Exercise Section 001
  • NDFS 494R: Undergrad Research in N D F S Section 007
  • NDFS 602: Advanced Human Nutrition 2 Section 001
  • NDFS 691R: Graduate Seminar Section 001

Selected Publications

Journal Articles

Hardman SE, Hall DE, Cabrera AJ, Hancock CR, Thomson DM. 2014. The effects of age and muscle contraction on AMPK activity and heterotrimer composition. Experimental Gerontology. 55:120-128.

Stallings MT, Cardon BR, Hardman JM, Bliss TA, Brunson SE, Hart CM, Swiss MD, Hepworth SD, Christensen MJ, Hancock CR. 2014. A high isoflavone diet decreases 5′ adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase activation and does not correct selenium-induced elevations in fasting blood glucose in mice. Nutrition Research. <website> doi:10.1016

Bridgewater LC, Mayo JL, Evanson BG, Whitt ME, Dean SA, Yates JD, Holden DN, Schmidt AD, Fox CL, Dhunghel S, et al. 2013. A novel bone morphogenetic protein 2 mutant mouse, nBmp2NLStm, displays impaired intracellular Ca2+ handling in skeletal muscle. BioMed Research International. 2013. <website>

Henriksen BS, Curtis ME, Fillmore N, Cardon BR, Thomson DM, Hancock CR. 2013. The effects of chronic AMPK activation on hepatic triglyceride accumulation and glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase activity with high fat feeding. Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome. 5(1).  doi:10.1186/1758-5996-5-29

Merrill JF, Thomson DM, Hardman SE, Hepworth SD, Willie S, Hancock CR. 2012. Iron deficiency causes a shift in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) subunit composition in rat skeletal muscle. Nutr Metab. 9(1).

Erickson KA, Smith ME, Anthonymuthu TS, Brassfield ES, Tucker BJ, Prince JT, Hancock CR, Bikman BT. 2012. AICAR inhibits ceramide biosynthesis in skeletal muscle. Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome. 4(45):1-7. <website>

Han D, Hancock CR, Jung SR, Higashida K, Kim SH, Holloszy JO. 2011. Deficiency of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in muscle does not cause insulin resistance. Plos One. 6(5):e19739.

Brown JD, Hancock CR, Mongillo AD, Barton BJ, Digiovanni RA, Parcell AC, Winder WW, Thomson DM. 2011. Effect of LKB1 deficiency on mitochondrial content, fiber type, and muscle performance in the mouse diaphragm. Acta Physiologica. 201(4):457-466.

Hancock CR, Han DH, Higashida K, Kim SH, Holloszy JO. 2010. Does calorie restriction induce mitochondrial biogenesis? A reevaluation. FASEB J. 25.

Thomson DM, Hancock CR, Evanson BG, Kenney SG, Mallan BB, Mongillo AD, Brown JD, Hepworth S, Fillmore N, Parcell AC, et al. 2010. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in muscle-specific LKB1 knockout mice. J Appl Physiol. 108:1775-1785.

Presentations

Mayo JL, Nichols BA, Olsen DS, Cordner RD, Hancock CR, Weber KS, Wilson E, Edwards JG, Barrow JR, Bridgewater LC. The nBMP2 mutant mouse shows defects in intracellular calcium transport-regulated pathways. Southwest Regional Meeting of the Society for Developmental Biology. Aurora, Colorado. 2014 .

Hancock CR. “Changes in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in response to chronic AMPK activation and elevated dietary fat.”. Southwest Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine Meeting. Newport Beach, CA. 2013 .

Hardman SE, Merrill JF, Thomson DM, Hancock CR. The effect of iron deficiency on AMPK subunit isoform composition in skeletal muscle. Experimental Biology. Boston, MA. 2013 .

Cardon BR, Stallings MT, Brunson SE, Hart CM, Swiss MD, Hepworth SD, Christensen MJ, Hancock CR. Dietary isoflavones and supplemental selenium show interactive effects on blood-glucose homeostasis in male FVB mice. Experimental Biology. San Diego, CA. 2012 .

Stallings MT, Hardman JM, Hart CM, Christensen MJ, Hancock CR. Fiber-type skeletal muscle response to dietary selenium and isoflavone supplementation in male mice. Experimental Biology. San Diego, CA. 2012 .

Merrill JF, Hepworth SD, Willie S, Winder WW, Thomson DM, Hancock CR. Iron deficiency causes a shift in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) catalytic subunit composition in rat skeletal muscle. Experimental Biology. San Diego, CA. 2012 .

Curtis M, Henriksen B, Fillmore N, Winder WW, Thomson DM, Hancock CR. Chronic activation of AMPK limits hepatic triglyceride accumulation independent of changes in total glycerol-3-phosphate-acyltransferase activity. Experimental Biology. Washington, DC. 2011 .

Thomson DM, Hancock CR, Evanson BG, Kenney SG, Malan BB, Mongillo AD, Brown JD, Hepworth S, Fillmore N, Parcell AC, et al. Muscle-specific LKB1 knockout leads to skeletal muscle dysfunction. FASEB Summer Research Conference- AMPK:Central Regulatory System in Metacolism & Growth. Kyoto, Japan. 2010 .

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