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Don Breakwell

Teaching Professor

2060G LSB
Provo, UT 84602

Memberships

  • The John Snow Society: ( - Present)
  • International Society for Salt Lake Research: ( - Present)
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science: ( - Present)
  • National Science Teachers Association: ( - Present)
  • American Society for Microbiology: ( - Present)

Professional Citizenship

  • Editorial Review Board Member, Journal of Biology and Microbiology Education, 2009-01-01 - 2009-12-31 - 2012-01-01 - 2012-12-31
  • Reviewer, Ad Hoc Reviewer, Trends in Microbiology Journal, 2009-01-01 - 2009-12-31 - 2009-01-01 - 2009-12-31
  • Committee/Council Chair, American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators (2008-2010), 2007-01-01 - 2007-12-31 - 2009-01-01 - 2009-12-31
  • Committee/Council Member, Committee on Undergraduate Education, American Society for Microbiology (2008-2010), 2007-01-01 - 2007-12-31 - 2009-01-01 - 2009-12-31
  • Committee/Council Chair, American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undegraduate Educators, 2006-01-01 - 2006-12-31 - 2006-01-01 - 2006-12-31
  • Reviewer, Ad Hoc Reviewer, Microbiology Education Journal, 2005-01-01 - 2005-12-31 - 2005-01-01 - 2005-12-31

Courses Taught

2020

  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 005
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 366 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 366 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 194 : Section 003
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • IAS 201R: Section 011
  • MMBIO 493R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 003
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 195 : Section 003

2019

  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 493R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 003
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 366 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 366 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 366 : Section 003
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 194 : Section 003
  • MMBIO 294R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 006
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 007
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 008
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 010
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 011
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 012
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 013
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 019
  • MMBIO 493R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 003
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 195 : Section 003

2018

  • LFSCI 399R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 020
  • MMBIO 493R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 003
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 194 : Section 003
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 699R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 003
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 005
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 006
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 007
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 003
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 194B: Section 003

2017

  • LFSCI 399R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 020
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 194A: Section 003
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 003
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 1
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 2
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 1
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 003
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 004
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 1
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 3
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 2
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 19
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001

2016

  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 020
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 2
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 490R: Section 1
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 003
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 1
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 003
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 4
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 699R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 003
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 1
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 2
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 1
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001

2015

  • LFSCI 399R: Section 1
  • MMBIO 110R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • LFSCI 101 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 2
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 003
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 004
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002

2014

  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 019
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 551R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 005
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 003

2013

  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 699R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 005
  • IAS 201R: Section 048
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 003
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 005
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 699R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 021
  • MMBIO 390R: Section 001

2012

  • MMBIO 194A: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 699R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 017
  • MMBIO 363 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 001
  • LFSCI 199R: Section 006
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 005
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 699R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002

2011

  • MMBIO 194A: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 018
  • MMBIO 462 : Section 001
  • LFSCI 399R: Section 003
  • MMBIO 399R: Section 002
  • IAS 380R: Section 018
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 695R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 194B: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 018

2010

  • MMBIO 194A: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 194B: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 004
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002

2009

  • MMBIO 194A: Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 494R: Section 025
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002

2008

  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • LFSCI 494R: Section 051
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • BIOL 494R: Section 004
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 003

2007

  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 151 : Section 002
  • BIOL 494R: Section 023
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 003
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 165 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 165 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 453 : Section 001
  • BIOL 494R: Section 017
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 003
  • MMBIO 351 : Section 001

2006

  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 165 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 165 : Section 002
  • BIOL 494R: Section 029
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 003
  • MMBIO 351 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 165 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 453 : Section 002
  • BIOL 494R: Section 011
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 004

2005

  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 165 : Section 001
  • BIOL 494R: Section 005
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 003
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 362R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 005
  • MMBIO 165 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 004

2004

  • MMBIO 365 : Section 003
  • MMBIO 362R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 165 : Section 001
  • BIOL 494R: Section 023
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 004
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 002
  • MMBIO 365 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 365 : Section 002
  • MMBIO 365 : Section 003
  • MMBIO 362R: Section 001
  • MMBIO 221 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 265 : Section 001
  • MMBIO 165 : Section 001
  • BIOL 494R: Section 017
  • MMBIO 494R: Section 004

Publications

  • Weber KS, Bridgewater LC, Jensen JL, Breakwell DP, Nielsen B, Johnson SM. April (2nd Quarter/Spring) 11, 2018. Personal microbiome analysis improves student engagement and interest in Immunology, Molecular Biology, and Genomics undergraduate courses . 4th ed.
  • Berg JA, Merrill BD, JT JTC, Esplin KP, Evans MR, Heaton KE, Hilton JA, Hyde JR, McBride MS, Schouten JT, et alJune 15, 2016. Characterization of Five Novel Brevibacillus Bacteriophages and Genomic Comparison of Brevibacillus Phages. 6th ed. an Francisco, CA: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science.
  • Aanderud ZT, Vert JC, Lennon JT, Magnusson TW, Breakwell DP, Harker AR. June 9, 2016. Bacterial Dormancy Is More Prevalent in Freshwater than Hypersaline Lakes.
  • Grose JH, Belnap DM, Jensen JD, Mathis AD, Prince JT, Merrill BD, Hope S, Breakwell DP. October (4th Quarter/Autumn), 2014. The Genomes, Proteomes, and Structures of Three Novel Phages That Infect the Bacillus cereus Group and Carry Putative Virulence Factors. Washington, D.C.: American Society for Microbiology.
  • Grose JH, Jensen GS, Hope S, Breakwell DP. October (4th Quarter/Autumn) 4, 2014. Genomic comparison of 93 Bacillus phages reveals 12 clusters, 14 singletons and remarkable diversity.
  • Merrill BD, Grose JH, Breakwell DP, Hope S. August 30, 2014. Characterization of Paenibacillus larvae bacteriophages and their genomic relationships to firmicute bacteriophages. Aug 30th ed. London: Biomed Central Ltd.
  • Tazi L, Breakwell DP, Harker AR, Keith CA. May, 2014. Life in extreme environments: microbial diversity in Great Salt Lake, Utah. 3rd ed.
  • Grose JH, Jensen JD, Merrill BD, Fisher J, Hope S, Breakwell DP. January (1st Quarter/Winter), 2014. The Genomes of Three Novel Bacillus cereus Bacteriophages. 1st ed.
  • Breakwell DP, Barrus EZ, Benedict AB, Brighton AK, Fisher JN, Gardner AV, Kartchner BJ, Ladle KC, Lunt BL, Merrill BD, et alNovember 27, 2013. Genome Sequences of Five Cluster B1 Mycobacteriophages. 6th ed.
  • Sheflo MA, Gardner AV, Merrill BD, Fisher JN, Lunt BL, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. November 14, 2013. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophages . 6th ed.
  • Smith KC, Castro-Nallar E, Fisher JN, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. June, 2013. Phage cluster relationships identified through single gene analysis. 410th ed.
  • Shen PS, Domek MJ, Sans-Garcia E, Majaju A, Taylor RM, Hoggan R, Culumber M, Oberg C, Breakwell DP, Prince JT, et alMay, 2012. Sequence and Structural Characterization of Great Salt Lake Bacteriophage CW02, a Member of the T7-like Supergroup . Washington, D.C.: American Society for Microbiology.
  • Hatfull G, program SEAPHAGaES(, Course KRIfTaH(MG, program PHIRaE(, Grose JH, Hope S, Breakwell DP. February, 2012. Complete genome sequences of 138 mycobacteriophages. 4th ed.
  • March JK, Jensen KC, Porter NT, Breakwell DP. December, 2011. Authentic Active Learning Activities Demonstrating the Use of Serial Dilutions and Plate Counts. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology.
  • Earley BJ, Engle JM, Smith KC, Lunt BL, Fisher JN, II DEP, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. September, 2011. Mycobacterium phage Jebeks, complete genome. JN572061st ed.

Presentations

  • Grose JH, Downey JL, Griffin BT, Jensen AR, Ludwig A, Spencer JB, Scott TM, Werff KSV, Pickett BE, Breakwell DP, et alComparative Genomic Analysis of Microbacterium foliorum Cluster EE phages. Intermountain Branch American Society for Microbiology. December, 2020.
  • Grose JH, Ayers H, Bustos Y, Ramsey J, Spoule C, Soule S, Telford M, Flor S, Breakwell DP. Exploring the Human Phageome through Sewage. Intermountain Branch American Society for Microbiology. December, 2020.
  • Rodriguez A, Allen K, Loertscher E, Melhado E, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Characterization of diversity in T-4 like Bacteriophages. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2019.
  • Moe BM, Michael C, Hanis TF, Stoker TA, Elton D, Flor SA, Divis T, Uricoechea L, Thurgood T, Breakwell DP, et alDiscovering Antibiotic Resistance Genes In Bacteriophages. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2019.
  • Cluff E, Abrams S, Allen C, Calder B, Carter O, Clarke T, Davies B, Doxey E, Eastley D, Hendricks MC, et alHost Range Analysis of Sinorhizobium Phages Reveals New Avenues for Studying Phage Receptor Binding. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2019.
  • Rodriguez A, Carr EL, Gaertner R, Kruger J, Melhado E, Loertscher E, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Isolation and Characterization of Novel but Ubiquitous Family of Serratia Phages. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2019.
  • Crump M, Breakwell DP. Phosphate-solubilizing bacteria isolated from the roots of a tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum). ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2019.
  • Taylor A, Davis R, Gaertner R, Thurgood T, Breakwell DP, Grose JH. RNA sequencing of Enterobacteriaceae Bacteriophages to Determine Gene Functions. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2019.
  • Olsen H, Weatherred M, Abrams S, Carter C, Calder B, Carter O, Clarke T, Cluff E, Davies B, Doxey E, et alThe Genome of Squally, A Novel T4-like Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2019.
  • Gleave AN, Carr EL, Loertscher E, Melhado E, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Characterization of 18 Bacteriophage Families Based on Distinct Protein Profile. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting Program. April, 2019.
  • Tueller JA, Jensen JL, Breakwell DP, Johnson SM, Weber KS. Personal microbiome analysis enhances student engagement in life sciences courses. American Society of Microbiology (Tri-Branch Meeting). April, 2018.
  • Jenkins J, Whitlock T, Greene N, Creaser I, Knowles A, Karlinsey D, Nelson N, Barton K, Bateman J, Quist N, et alHost Range and Receptor Binding of 13 Newly-Isolated Phages Infecting Sinorhizobium meliloti. Intermountain ASM TriBranch Meeting. April, 2018.
  • Fajardo C, Meredith S, Roll C, C, Griffitts JS, Hope S, Grose JH, Breakwell DP. Proof of Concept: Determining Phage Adsorption Using Flow Cytometry. Intermountain ASM TriBranch Meeting. April, 2018.
  • Whitlock T, Greene N, Creaser I, Knowles A, Karlinsey D, Nelson N, Barton K, Bateman J, Quist N, Hendrickson J, et alThe genomes of CW76, a unique phage, and XTREME, a T4-like phage infecting Sinorhizobium meliloti. Intermountain ASM TriBranch Meeting. April, 2018.
  • Melhado E, Sarabia R, Loertscher E, Sharma R, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Bacteriophage diversity revealed by nine novel Enterobacteriaceae phages isolated from sewage samples. Tri-Branch ASM meeting. April, 2018.
  • Melhado E, Chow J, Wiley M, Sarabia R, Standing N, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Isolation and Characterization of Sewage Phages. Tri-Branch ASM meeting. April, 2018.
  • Grose JH, Colby B, Ballard T, Fajardo C, Kruger J, Duncan S, Webb C, Sharma R, Breakwell DP, Hope S, et alThe Bee’s and the Tree’s: Phage Hunting at BYU 2016-2017. 9th Annual SEA-Phages Symposium. June, 2017.
  • Ballard T, Withers J, Duncan S, Breakwell D, Hope S, Grose JH. Dots, Dots, Lines: A Dot Plot Comparison of the Erwinia Phage Frozen. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2017.
  • Colby B, Stubbs O, Bell K, Radar K, Sharma R, Duncan S, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Analysis of Interesting Proteins in Deimos-Minion Bacteriophage Family. Intermountain Branch ASM meeting. April, 2017.
  • Grose JH, Judge L, Harley K, Sharma R, Duncan S, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Comparative Genomics of Four Erwinia Bacteriophages and N4, a Pathogenic Driving Force in E coli. Intermountain Branch ASM meeting. April, 2017.
  • Grose JH, Freestone C, Hughes J, Loertscher E, Sharma R, Duncan S, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Genome Comparison of Five Erwinia amylovora Bacteriophages . Intermountain Branch ASM Meeting. April, 2017.
  • Cardinal J, Gille J, Fe K, Salazar E, Sharma R, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Discovery of Likely Transcriptional Regulons and Hypothesized Protein Function in Phage RAY of the Deimos-Minion Family through Motif Analysis . Intermountain Branch ASM meeting, . April, 2017.
  • Cardinal J, Gille J, Fe K, Salazar E, Sharma R, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Discovery of Likely Transcriptional Regulons and Hypothesized Protein Function in Phage RAY of the Deimos-Minion Family through Motif Analysis . Intermountain Branch ASM meeting, . April, 2017.
  • Duncan S, Hurst E, Berg J, Ward A, Hilton J, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. Paenibacillus Larvae Phages Contain Regions of Conserved Synteny Despite Large Genomic Differences. SEA-Phages Symposium. June, 2016.
  • Harris N, Hurst E, James B, Pollock S, Smith H, Webb C, Fajardo C, Hilton J, Ward A, Breakwell DP, et alGenomic Characterization of Honeybear and Related Phage Toothless. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2016.
  • Allen R, Bybee RN, Fuhriman DA, Ririe DB, Thompson SE, Usher BK, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. Genome Analysis of Lycanus and DevRi. Phage Phield Day. April, 2016.
  • Harris N, Hurst E, James B, Pollock SV, Smith H, Webb CJ, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. Phage Honeybear and Related Phage Toothless. Phage Phield Day. April, 2016.
  • Bloomfield T, Buhler B, Duncan S, Knabe, Stephenson M, Wells, Wright C, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. Genomic Analysis and Characterization of PBL1C: The First Discovered Paenibacillus Larvae Phage. Phage Phield Day. January, 2016.
  • Grose JH, Crockett JT, Esplin KP, Hyde JR, Breakwell DP, Hope S. Brevibacillus Bacteriophages Xane and Jenst Reveal a DNA Motif Indicating a Gene Regulatory Sequence. Tri-Branch ASM Meeting. Brevibacillus laterosporus is an aerobic, spore forming bacterium that has been found as a secondary infection of honeybees afflicted with European Foulbrood B laterosporus bacteriophages have the ability to infect these bacteria, and may potentially prevent or limit their spread There are currently only ten known B laterosporus bacteriophages, of which only five genomes have been published We examined motifs found in the genomes of two novel B laterosporus bacteriophages, Xane and Jenst All living organisms, including viruses and bacteriophages, possess genetic regulatory sequences that modulate when certain genes are expressed Using MEME, a program that identifies repeated DNA sequences of 20-50 bp in length, we found a common motif repeated throughout the genomes of Xane and Jenst Using another program, FIMO, we identified the exact locations of these conserved DNA motifs in both genomes Further analysis revealed that this DNA motif was located immediately before important proteins such as DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase, and DNA binding proteins We propose that this DNA motif is a transcription factor binding site involved in regulating expression of bacteriophage genes that are required upon initial phage infection This motif is also found upstream of DNA metabolism genes in other large genome Bacillus sp bacteriophages, suggesting a conserved regulatory mechanism in early phage infection. April, 2015.
  • Grose JH, McBride MS, Brundage BM, Berg J, Merrill B, Evans MR, Breakwell DP, Hope S. Comparing Protein Structures of a Transcriptional Regulator Repeated in Brevibacillus Phages. Tri-Branch ASM Meeting. Brevibacillus laterosporus causes a secondary infection found in beehives infected with European Foulbrood We investigated ten recently identified phages that infect B laterosporus Using Phamerator, we identified that four of these phages (Jimmer1, Jimmer2, Osiris, and Powder) had multiple copies of the same gene encoding a transcriptional regulator Phages Abouo and Davies only had a single copy of this gene Copies of these genes were not completely identical, thus some changes in amino acid sequence and overall protein structure were predicted We used Clustal Omega to create a multiple alignment chart and a phylogenetic tree that allowed us to pinpoint the exact differences between the amino acid sequences This enabled us to find that the genes could be separated into two groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity Using the program Raptor X to predict a 3-D protein structure model, residues were identified that are likely to be involved in DNA binding Using the program Strap, we were able to compare our proteins to a similar transcriptional regulator found in phage P22 The similarities between the repeated proteins suggest that the genes have begun to evolve independently of one another Analyzing these variants aids in understanding the plasticity of this protein . April, 2015.
  • Grose JH, Hilton JA, Schouten JT, Merrill B, Berg J, Breakwell DP, Hope S. Discovery of Two Novel Phage Clusters in Brevibacillus laterosporus Using Comparative Genomics. Tri-Branch ASM Meeting. Brevibacillus laterosporus (BL) is a spore-forming Firmicute that produces toxins against a wide range of organisms, including insect larvae BL often infects beehives following infection by Melissacoccus plutonius, the causative agent of European Foulbrood and is thought to play a role in disease development Phages represent a novel control method for BL infection Five BL phages have previously been sequenced, compared, and reported Herein we report five novel BL phages We compared their sequences using Gepard, and determined their average nucleotide identities using Kalign In addition, we used their terminase sequences to generate a phylogenetic tree using MEGA6 Since phages can be organized into clusters based on genomic similarity, we propose two new BL phage clusters One includes phages Jenst and Xane, and another is defined by BL phage Sundance We also assign the phages Powder and Osiris to the previously defined Jimmer-like cluster Defining clusters is useful in understanding phage evolution and also for designing cocktails for phage therapy Including phages from different clusters in a therapeutic cocktail increases the diversity of infection mechanisms Since bacteria can become resistant to a particular phage, this lowers the probability of bacterial resistance. April, 2015.
  • Grose JH, Simister A, Heaton K, Merrill B, Berg J, Thurgood T, Breakwell DP, Hope S. The Mosaic Nature and Evolution of Three Brevibacillus Phages and Their Impact on Brevibacillus laterosporus and Other Bacteria. Tri-Branch ASM Meeting. Brevibacillus laterosporus is a spore forming bacteria that is a contributing factor to the disease European Foulbrood, a disease that infects and kills honeybee larvae The spread of this bacterium through beehives has had devastating effects on this ecological niche In an effort to find ways to protect bees from this disease, 10 Brevibacillus phages were isolated and sequenced from samples collected in the Utah Valley Region Additional characterization of these phages was conducted by examining Brevibacillus phages, Jenst, Xane, and Sundance, using Phamerator genomic map comparisons, Gepard dot plots, HHPred conserved domain predictions, as well as DNA Master genome annotation It was discovered that Xane and Sundance contain a similar 4,500 base pair region not present in Jenst BLAST hits to this area revealed homology to genes found in Brevibacillus laterosporus, as well as other bacteria, that codes for transcriptional regulators There were inverted repeats found in this region which indicates that it is likely a transposon The average nucleotide identity (ANI) of the transposon in Xane contained a much lower GC content than the rest of its genome, while the GC content of the same region in Sundance was much more consistent with its genome Phylogenetic trees of the transcriptional regulators found in Xane, Jenst, Sundance, and homologous regions contained within Brevibacillus and other bacteria were created, showing that the genes in Jenst and Xane had a much higher similarity to each other than the genes found in B laterosporus and Sundance Combined, this evidence suggests that Sundance acquired this transposable region long before Xane and that after Xane acquired the transposon, it imprecisely excised from the genome, creating a novel phage - Jenst The mosaic nature of phages is demonstrated here by this transposon inserting and excising itself from phage genomes This research underscores our understanding of phage access to the bacterial gene pool and how this access can affect the evolution of phages, allowing them to better infect their host. April, 2015.
  • Grose JH, Jensen J, Berg J, Esplin I, Foy B, Grossarth S, Harbaugh K, Ingersoll K, Kruger J, Peck M, et alIsolation and Characterization of Eleven Phages that Infect Erwinia amylovora . 6th Annual HHMI SEA-PHAGES Symposium . June, 2014.
  • Wienclaw TM, Taylor AS, Bairett AC, Merrill BD, Schoenhals JE, Esplin ID, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. Phage Jenst provides a unique genome with gene products new to Paenibacillus larvae phages. 6th Annual HHMI SEA-Phages Symposium. June, 2014.
  • Ransom E, Berg J, Grossarth S, Smith H, Anieves D, Esplin ID, Merrill BD, Schoenhals JE, Breakwell DP, Hope S, et alComparative Genome Analysis of Seven Novel Erwinia Phages Reveals Orthologous Proteins and Allows for Formation of a Cluster with Three Known Enterobacteriaceae Phages. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2014.
  • Stratton M, Harbaugh K, Foy B, Anieves D, Paz H, Shurtleff C, Kruger J, Peck M, Jensen G, Esplin ID, et alDiscovery and Genomic Analysis of an N4-like Erwinia amylovora Phage Poster presentation. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2014.
  • Schoenhal JE, Merrill BD, Graves KA, Grose JH, Hope S, Breakwell DP. DNA Packaging Strategies for Bacteriophages Identified Using Phylogenetic Analysis of Large Terminase Proteins. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2014.
  • Ingersoll K, Jensen G, Kruger J, Foy B, Grossarth S, Harbaugh K, Paz H, Esplin ID, Schoenhals JE, Merrill BD, et alIsolation and Characterization of Deimos-Minion, the Largest Erwinia amylovora Bacteriophage. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2014.
  • Taylor AS, Bairett SR, Wienclaw TM, Esplin ID, Schoenhals JE, Merrill BD, CRA, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. Isolation and Characterization of Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophage Jenst. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2014.
  • Vert J, Harker AR, Breakwell DP, Aanderud ZT. Exploring bacterial and archaeal dormancy in hypsersaline and freshwater lakes. International Biological Summit. August, 2013.
  • Merrill BD, Sheflo MA, Ayer PA, Beckstead AP, Fajardo CP, Ferguson NC, Fisher JNB, Gardner AV, Graves KA, Hartmann KA, et alDiscovery and Characterization of Novel Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophages. 5th Annual SEA-Phages Symposium. June, 2013.
  • Herring JA, Deus LM, Manci AM, Meadows HN, Heiner ME, Willyerd HJ, Gardner AV, Fisher JNB, Smith K, Grose JH, et alPhage cluster and subcluster identification using Tape Measure Protein primers in a PCR reaction. 5th Annual SEA-Phages Symposium. June, 2013.
  • Vert J, Harker AR, Breakwell DP, Aanderud ZT. Exploring microbial dormancy of bacterial and archaeal communities in extreme hypsersaline and freshwater lakes. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch. May, 2013.
  • Vert J, Harker AR, Breakwell DP, Aanderud ZT. Extremophile dormancy: using targeted metagenomics to identify microbial community composition in hypersaline and freshwater lakes. Spring Runoff Conference. April, 2013.
  • Vert J, Magnusson T, Harker AR, Breakwell DP, Aanderud ZT. Seasonal fluctuations of multiple lake characteristics influence bacterial dormancy in the Great Salt Lake. Spring Runoff Conference. April, 2013.
  • Merrill BD, Sheflo MA, Ayer PA, Beckstead AP, Fajardo CP, Ferguson NC, Fisher JNB, Gardner AV, Graves KA, Hartmann KA, et alDiscovery and Characterization of Novel Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophages. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. March, 2013.
  • Gardner AV, Adawii EC, Christiansen MR, Ferguson NC, Irons DL, Jensen J, Kennedy A, Lloyd JS, Marlow S, Mason S, et alProposal for A1 Subcluster Division and Evidence of Evolutionary Events in B1 and B4 Subclusters . Science Education Alliance (SEA) Annual Symposia. June, 2012.
  • Williams KR, Adawi EC, Kennedy AK, Poe DE, Brighton AK, Fisher J, Sheflo MA, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Divergent evolution of a RuvC holliday junction resolvase in the B1 sub cluster. Intermountain Branch ASM Meeting. April, 2012.
  • Ferguson NC, Irons DL, Marlow SC, McCord TM, Brighton AK, Fisher J, Sheflo MA, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. Division of the Mycobacteriophage A1 subcluster based on phylogenetic comparison. Intermountain Branch ASM Meeting. April, 2012.
  • Gardner AV, Brighton AK, FIsher JN, Sheflo MA, Breakwell DP, Grose JH, Hope S. Environmental Effect on Phage Genomes: Analysis of the B4 Subcluster. Intermountain Branch ASM Meeting. April, 2012.
  • Lloyd JS, Norton CS, Sullivan S, Pettersson SM, Fisher J, Brighton A, Sheflo MA, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Lack of correlation between phage clusters and ecoregions in the United States. Intermountain Branch ASM Meeting. April, 2012.
  • Mason SS, Gardner AV, Nelson EP, Christansen MR, Brighton AK, FIsher JN, Sheflo MA, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Mislabling of the Second Tape Measure Protein. Intermountain Branch ASM Meeting. April, 2012.
  • Jensen JD, Merrill BD, Russell RC, Smith TC, Brighton AK, Fisher J, Sheflo MA, Breakwell DP, Hope S, Grose JH. Phylogenetic origin of glutaredoxin gene shared by mycobacteriophage A1 sub cluster, distantly related bacteria, and other bacteriophages. Intermountain Branch ASM Meeting. April, 2012.
  • Brighton AK, Fisher J, Lunt BL, Taylor MA, Smith KC, Baker EZBB, Chapman KM, Drake EA, Jackson KR, Kartchner BJ, et alAdditional Evidence for Frameshifts in A2 and Gene Mosaicism in F Mycobacteriophage. Science Education Alliance (SEA) Annual Symposia. Mycobacteriophages are grouped into 15 clusters and 30 subclusters to provide a framework for studying their diversity and evolutionary history While studying genomic similarities in clusters, support was found for gene mosaicism and frameshifts that facilitate read-through on the 3’ end of a structural gene Sixteen mycobacteriophage infecting Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155 were isolated, their DNA extracted and sequenced, and their clusters identified using Gepard dotplot comparisons Two phage genomes, TA17A (A2 subcluster) and Shauna1 (F1 subcluster) were annotated using Apollo Alignments, comparisons, and phylogenetic trees were generated by BLAST, Phamerator, ClustalW, Mega5, and Mr Bayes Additional comparisons were made using electron microscope images and map data generated by GoogleEarth and ArcGIS Mapping and analysis of soil properties showed limited correlation between locality or environment and phage clustering Genomic comparisons of mycobacteriophage TA17A to other A2 subcluster phages revealed two conserved versions of a tail protein, expressed through a frameshift In addition, TA17A lacked an integrase gene found in most other A2 phages Genomic comparisons of mycobacteriophage Shauna1 to other F cluster phages showed a conserved holin protein-encoding gene An example of mosaicism was exemplified in the 17-25 kb region of Shauna1 that did not contain a sequence typical for other F1 phages in this region The region instead contained homology to F2 subcluster phages These findings provide additional support for frameshifts as a mechanism of alternative gene expression in mycobacteriophage They also give added evidence for gene mosaicism, perhaps resulting from discrete gene transfers by genetic recombination This evidence, along with the other features discovered within the genomes of TA17A and Shauna1, suggests possibilities for the evolution of the A2 subcluster and the F cluster, respectively . June, 2011.
  • Grose JH, Breakwell DP, Hope S. Out of the SEA: Getting Students to Crawl on Land. Science Education Alliance (SEA) Annual Symposia. Students completing the BYU-HHMI Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Program are encouraged to continue developing their skills and interests We have identified four different streams for students to further channel their participation in research First, students can continue genome annotation during the summer The BYU College of Life Sciences supported sequencing of phage genomes beyond the one sequenced by SEA This allowed students to annotate additional genomes For instance, we sequenced 17 unique phage genomes our first year and 16 this year Second, some students were selected to serve as teaching assistants for the next phage hunter’s course These students not only help train the next group but follow-up on the previous year’s work One to three students are chosen each year for this position Third, some students participate in mentored research of specific phage-related projects Four students have taken advantage of this opportunity Fourth, the strong laboratory skills obtained during the course prepares them to enter other research labs Students have a choice of mentored research with faculty on campus or internships at other institutions Of the 2009-10 class, 93% of continuing students have begun working on mentored research projects in laboratories at BYU and 40% have chosen to be interns at other institutions Of the 2010-11 class, 43% of continuing students have begun mentored research projects, and 14% have begun an internship We expect the 2010-11 numbers to increase since this year’s program only recently ended These four streams are opportunities for SEA students to become independent and productive scientists after their experience in phage hunters. June, 2011.
  • Kartchner BJ, Kiser JT, Kiser CD, McDaniel SW, Taylor MA, Fisher J, Lunt B, Hope S, Grose JH, Breakwell DP. Clustering of Mycobacteriophage in the Utah Landscape. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria of the genus Mycobacterium Some phages release a holin protein that initiates host lysis and release of progeny phage It does this by increasing permeability of the cell membrane by creating 4 nm circular rings in the cytoplasm at a specific time thus allowing an endolysin to pass through and degrade the cell wall After analysis of the genome of F1 subcluster phage (FSP) Shauna1, we discovered the holin-coding sequence as gp29 As we made comparisons with other FSP, we made two observations: 1) All FSP possess the holin gene and 2) Holin genes are a unique feature of F cluster phages BlastX revealed that Renibacterium salmoninarum possesses a gene (RSal33209_1364) that is homologous to the holin genes found in FSP We initially hypothesized that they share a common bacterial progenitor similar to Renibacterium salmoninarum: the sequence may well have mutated to produce a holin gene Using Mega5 alignment, we analyzed the amino acid sequences between phage holin and RSal33209_1364 and discovered minor discrepancies Using a Mega5 minimum evolution tree, we compared potential phylogenies and observed that contrary to our initial hypothesis, the bacteria branched off of the phage line We concluded that our original hypothesis was incorrect and that the opposite must be true Since a bacterial holin would be unfavorable for a bacterium, potentially causing self-lysis, we propose that these bacterial genes originated from a progenitor phage of the F cluster . April, 2011.
  • Smith KC, Hope S, Grose JH, Breakwell DP. Degenerate PCR Primers to Identify Mycobacteriophage Clusters and Sub-Clusters. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. Common amongst all mycobacteriophage are unique tails used for infection of the host bacterium, Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155 Associated with these tails is a lengthy gene encoding a Tape Measure Protein (TMP) Analysis of TMP gene sequence demonstrated considerable homology within individual sub-clusters but substantial variation between sub-clusters Our hypothesis was that the TMP gene sequence could potentially be used to distinguish between mycobacteriophage sub-clusters Degenerate PCR primers would be useful in identifying phage clusters without the need for complete genome sequencing To accomplish this, we performed a nucleotide alignment of 83 TMP genes using ClustalW This demonstrated congruence of gene sequence with mycobacteriophage cluster and subcluster designations For each subcluster we generated and derived degenerate primers using a consensus sequence Primer pairs were chosen to ensure that amplicons of different sizes would be produced to include resolution of all subclusters within each cluster Following optimization of PCR conditions, we tested a variety of primer pairs Amplicons ranged from 300-800bp The method was shown to be effective for DNA extracted from a high liter lysate, boiled high titer lysate, and boiled plaque spot test samples We show that TMP gene amplification is a suitable and effective method for determining mycobacteriophage cluster and sub-clusters . April, 2011.
  • Brighton AK, Vance KS, Parker KRJM, Steck RP, Ormsby WR, Taylor MA, Fisher J, Lunt B, Hope S, Grose JH, et alGene Mosaicism Demonstrated in Mycobacteriophage Shauna1. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. Mycobacteriophages exhibit remarkable gene mosaicism Comparative genomic analysis of Shauna1, a recently isolated phage, reveals a region of significant gene mosaicism It was hypothesized that the lack of homology between the 17-25kb region in Shauna1’s genome and other F1 sub-cluster phage genomes is a result of genetic recombination events; these discrete gene transfers resulted in the inclusion of unexpected genes Using Gepard dotplot comparisons and BLAST analyses, these recombination events were examined with greater resolution A phylogenetic tree was then constructed using MAFFT, ALTER, and MrBayes and inferences were drawn The Gepard dotplot comparison between Shauna1 and other known F1 sub-cluster phages shows a nearly linear alignment (representing high homology) across the entire genome, except for one gap This missing portion of homogeneity (from 17-25kb) occurs in the same place for every comparison, and represents an area of genetic mosaicism in Shauna1 A dotplot comparison between Shauna1 and phages from the F2 and E sub-clusters shows significant homology in this specific region of the genome, with particularly high identity to the F2 phage Che9d BLAST analysis of the five genes contained in this region reveals potential HNH and RDF functions in addition to the structural protein functions characteristic of the region in the F1 phages Other F1 phages contain genes with HNH and RDF functions in other regions of their genome It was concluded that discrete gene transfers from phage of other sub-clusters occurred in the 17-25kb region of Shauna1, resulting in the observed mosaic pattern in the genome. April, 2011.
  • Kitchen JC, Brighton AK, Chapman KM, Baker B, Taylor MA, Fisher J, Lunt B, Hope S, Grose JH, Breakwell DP. Morphological Traits of Mycobacteriophage Clusters and Sub-Clusters. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. Mycobacteriophages are represented by only two phage taxa: Myoviridae and Siphoviridae Superimposed on this classification are 15 clusters with 30 subclusters that have been characterized using genomic similarities Of all mycobacteriophage isolated to date, there are 9 singletons and 1097 phage of unknown cluster Identifying clusters and sub clusters is vital for understanding the diversity of mycobacteriophages One method that has been proposed for phage cluster identification is morphology Using transmission electron micrographs we analyzed capsid and tail parameters of representative phages of all known mycobacteriophage clusters and subclusters We demonstrated that there are noticeable trends within and amongst the clusters While there are obvious differences between some clusters: for example, the C (Myoviridae) cluster has large heads and short tails that contrast significantly with the Siphoviridae clusters that have comparatively smaller heads and long tails longer than 150 nm However in the subclusters, such comparisons are more difficult to make For example, in subcluster A2 the mean head to tail ratio was 205 + 012, while subcluster A3 had a mean ratio of 227 + 032 Our analysis suggests that while there is significant correlation between some parameters, using a morphological approach to clustering mycobacteriophage is, at best, tenuous . April, 2011.
  • Barrus EZ, Sheide MG, Taylor MA, Fisher J, Lunt B, Hope S, Grose JH, Breakwell DP. Shauna1 Mycobacteriaphage holin gene confirms common ancestry of all F cluster phage. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria of the genus Mycobacterium Some phages release a holin protein that initiates host lysis and release of progeny phage It does this by increasing permeability of the cell membrane by creating 4 nm circular rings in the cytoplasm at a specific time thus allowing an endolysin to pass through and degrade the cell wall After analysis of the genome of F1 subcluster phage (FSP) Shauna1, we discovered the holin-coding sequence as gp29 As we made comparisons with other FSP, we made two observations: 1) All FSP possess the holin gene and 2) Holin genes are a unique feature of F cluster phages BlastX revealed that Renibacterium salmoninarum possesses a gene (RSal33209_1364) that is homologous to the holin genes found in FSP We initially hypothesized that they share a common bacterial progenitor similar to Renibacterium salmoninarum: the sequence may well have mutated to produce a holin gene Using Mega5 alignment, we analyzed the amino acid sequences between phage holin and RSal33209_1364 and discovered minor discrepancies Using a Mega5 minimum evolution tree, we compared potential phylogenies and observed that contrary to our initial hypothesis, the bacteria branched off of the phage line We concluded that our original hypothesis was incorrect and that the opposite must be true Since a bacterial holin would be unfavorable for a bacterium, potentially causing self-lysis, we propose that these bacterial genes originated from a progenitor phage of the F cluster . April, 2011.
  • Chapman KM, Baker B, Drake EA, Kitchen J, Taylor MA, Fisher J, Lunt B, Hope S, Grose JH, Breakwell DP. TA17A: A Unique Member of the Mycobacteriophage Sub-Cluster A2. ASM Intermountain Branch Meeting. Mycobacteriophage are host specific viruses that infect mycobacteria Mycobacteriophage TA17A was isolated from soil adjacent to Utah Lake State Park, using the host Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155 To more fully characterize TA17A we sequenced and annotated its genome We used the genome alignment program, Gepard, to identify TA17A as a member of the mycobateriophage A2 sub-cluster For annotation we used the programs Glimmer, Genemark, GenemarkTB, and Apollo TA17A has high homology to a previously isolated phage, Redrock, that had been isolated from soil in Sedona, AZ However, the TA17A genome harbored two novel genes in a 1125 base pair region To date these genes have unknown function In addition to these differences TA17A exhibited a tail protein that is expressed through a +1 frameshift Although many bacteriophages have this frameshift, it is found in only two other 12 members of the A2 sub-cluster Mycobacteriophage TA17A provides an evolutionary comparison to other A2 phage because of its regional and genetic similarity to phage RedRock . April, 2011.
  • Hope S, Breakwell DP. Data Overload: Letting Freshmen Students “Have At” Mycobacteriophage Lab Work and Comparative Genomics. National Genomics Research Initiative Second Annual Symposium. June, 2010.
  • Sargent CJ, Hope S, Payne DE, Lunt BL, Argueta LB, Benedict A, Bull LA, Daetwyler ME, Earley BJ, Engle JM, et alGenomic Analysis of the Newly-Isolated Subcluster B1 Mycobacteriophage KLucky39 Reveals a Novel Putative Peptidase and a Primase, the Lack of Five Anticipated Genes, and the Relationship of KLucky39 to Other Phage. National Genomics Research Initiative Second Annual Symposium. June, 2010.
  • Hope S, Argueta L, Petersen S, Sabin D, Sargent C, Taylor MA, Lunt BL, Payne DE, Breakwell DP. Addition of Novel Mycobacteriophage to Pre-existing Subclusters of the B Cluster. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2010.
  • Hope S, Haskell K, Earley B, Bajgain P, Breakwell DP. Comparison of KLucky39 Mycobacteriophage With Bacterium E Coli. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2010.
  • Hope S, Hansen A, Ladle K, Benedict A, Lunt BL, Payne DE, Breakwell DP. Mycobacteriophage Exhibit Discrepancies in the Distance of Shine-Dalgarno Sequences from the Start Codon. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2010.
  • Hope S, Smith KC, Daetwyler ME, Liechty ZS, Severson MC, Wright B, Lunt BL, Payne DE, Breakwell DP. Tape Measure Protein in Mycobacteriophage KLucky39 Shows Evolution of Phage Clusters. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2010.
  • Hope S, Engle J, Woodward T, Greenhalgh E, Haskell K, Lunt BL, Payne DE, Breakwell DP. The Genome of Mycobacteriophage KLucky39 Reveals a Putative M23 Peptidase Gene. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2010.
  • Hope S, Fisher J, Giri I, Issac T, Breakwell DP. The Mycobacteriophage KLucky39 Genome Lacks Five Genes Commonly Found in Other Mycobacteriophage Subcluster B1 Genomes. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. April, 2010.
  • Grose JH, Breakwell DP. A Modified Ames Test to Teach Mutations and Mutagens. American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators. 2009.
  • Breakwell DP, Grose JH. Augmenting A General Microbiology Course for Non-Majors with TA-Led Active Learning Help Sessions. American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators. 2009.
  • Breakwell DP, Grose JH. Genotypes, Phenotypes and Mutants: Analysis of the NAD(P) Biosynthetic Pathways. American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators. 2009.
  • Breakwell DP. Using Variety in Your Teaching to Enhance Student Learning. Faculty Development Series Spring Seminar. 2009.
  • Breakwell DP, Prince EG. Correlation Of Student Learning Preferences With Study Practices. American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators. 2008.
  • Breakwell DP, Harker AR, Slight SR. Susceptibility of Extreme Halophiles to Mercury using Resazurin Reduction Kinetics. American Society for Microbiology General Meeting. 2008.
  • Breakwell DP, Fuja DG, Healey DW. Inquiry-based Learning In An Introductory Microbiology Laboratory Course for Majors. American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators. 2007.
  • Breakwell DP, Fuja DG, Healey DW. Inquiry-based Learning In An Introductory Microbiology Laboratory Course for Majors. American Society for Microbiology General Meeting. 2007.
  • Harker AR, Breakwell DP, Taxi L, Haws E. Microbial Ecology of Culturable Organisms at Rozel Point in Great Salt Lake, UT. American Society for Microbiology General Meeting. 2006.
  • Breakwell DP, Johnson MD, Nielson NP, Deus SB, Noorda S, Harker AR. Spatial Heterogeneity of Enzyme Activity in Sediments of Great Salt Lake, UT. American Society for Microbiology General Meeting. 2006.
  • Harker AR, Breakwell DP, Haws E, Tazi L. Microbial Ecology of Culturable Organisms at Rozel Point in Great Salt Lake, UT. American Society for Microbiology, General Meeting. 2006.
  • Breakwell DP, Sweetwood RV, Terry RE, Harker AR. Is There A Paradox Regarding The Nitrogen Cycle in Great Salt Lake?. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. 2006.
  • Breakwell DP, Haws E, Tazi >, Harker AR. Microbial Ecology of Culturable Organisms at Rozel Point in Great Salt Lake, UT. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. 2006.
  • Nielson N, Harker AR, Breakwell DP. Spatial Heterogeneity of Microbial Activity in Great Salt Lake Sediments. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. 2006.
  • Johnson MD, Deus SB, Harker AR, Breakwell DP. The Utility of Alkaline Phosphatase Assay to Determine Spatial Heterogeneity in Great Salt Lake Sediments. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Branch Meeting. 2006.
  • Harker AR, Breakwell DP, Johnson MD, Deus SB. The Utility of Alkaline Phosphatase Assay to Determine Spatial Heterogeneity in Great Salt Lake Sediments. Intermountain Branch, American Society for Microbiology. 2006.
  • Harker AR, Tazi L, Breakwell DP, Crandall KA, Haws E. Microbial Communities in Great Salt Lake. NSF FIBR Workshop - Microbial Species Diversity. 2006.
  • Breakwell DP, Barker EM, Johnson MD, Harker AR. Establishing A Case for a Metabolic Island in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. 9th Conference, International Society for Salt Lake Research. 2005.
  • Harker AR, Crandall KA, Breakwell DP, Drysdale SS, LT, Pickett BE, Dahlquist SB. Microbial Diversity in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. American Society for Microbiology. 2005.
  • Breakwell DP, Hope S. Encouraging mentored undergraduate research using a student-customized, modular-format laboratory course. American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators. 2005.
  • Breakwell DP, Drysdale SS, Tazi L, Pickett BE, Dahlquist SB, Crandall KA, Harker AR. Microbial Diversity in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. American Society for Microbiology General Meeting. 2005.
  • Breakwell DP, Pickett BE. Antibiotic Resistance Gene Cassettes Associated With Integrons in Escherichia coli. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Regional Meeting. 2005.
  • LT, Dahlquist SB, Deus SB, Drysdale SS, Haws ES, Breakwell DP, Crandall KA, Harker AR. Biodiversity Analysis of Archaeal Community in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. American Society for Microbiology Intermountain Regional Meeting. 2005.
  • Harker AR, Breakwell DP, Crandall DP, Tazi L, Dahlquist SB, Deus SB, Drysdale SS, Haws ES. Biodiversity Analysis of the Archaeal Community in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. ASM, Intermountain Branch Meeting. 2005.
  • Breakwell DP. Using Variety in Your Teaching to Enhance Student Learning. Faculty Development Series Spring Seminar. 2005.
  • Harker AR, Breakwell DP, Barker EC, Johnson MD. Establishing a Case for a Metabolic Island in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. International Society for Salt Lake Research. 2005.
  • Breakwell DP. A Lectora template to prepare students for the microbiology laboratory. Teachnology Expo Center for Instructional Design. 2005.
  • Breakwell DP. Magnifying Self-Assessment of Teaching and Learning By Focusing on Course Objectives. Eleventh American Society for Undergraduate Education Conference. 2004.
  • Paul C, Nelson S, Williams F, Terry R, Breakwell DP. Microbial Transport Through Effluent-Amended Soils. Soil Science Society of America Meeting. 2004.
  • Breakwell DP. Working with TAs to Design and Teach Lab Sections. TA Supervisor Seminar. 2004.
Don Breakwell