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Robert Johnson

Research Professor
Biology

3115A MLBM
Provo, UT 84602

Biography

Biography


I was born in Delta, Utah and grew up as a teenager in American Fork, Utah. I got a B.S. and M.S. degree in Botany and Plant Ecology at Brigham Young University. After graduation I worked as a plant ecologist for the Department of Defense at Dugway Proving Ground for nearly 10 years followed by several years working as a Research Scientist at Brigham Young University. During this time I finished a Doctoral degree in Restoration Ecology and then took a job working for the Southern Nevada Water Authority managing a Nature Preserve in Warm Springs, Moapa, Nevada. Currently I am a faculty member in the Department of Biology at BYU with a primary responsibility as the plant collection manager for the Stanley L. Welsh Herbarium, Monte L. Bean Museum. Naturally I like plants, but also have a fondness for insects, poultry, history, and sugar.

Research Interests

    • Plant taxonomy
    • Plant-insect interactions

    Education

    • PhD, Plant and Wildlife Sciences, Brigham Young University, 2008
    • MS, Plant Ecology, Brigham Young University, 1993
    • BS, Botany and Range, Brigham Young University, 1991

    Memberships

    • Society of Herbarium Curators, 2015-Present
    • American Penstemon Society, 2014-Present
    • American Society of Plant Taxonomists, 2014-Present

    Courses Taught

    Fall 2018

    • BIO 235: Field Botany Section 002

    Winter 2018

    • BIO 494R: Mentored Research Section 009

    Spring 2017

    • BIO 235: Field Botany Section 001

    Fall 2016

    • BIO 235: Field Botany Section 002
    • BIO 494R: Mentored Research Section 010

    Research Interests

    Plant taxonomy, plant-insect interactions.

    Education

    • PhD, Plant and Wildlife Sciences , institution ( 2008-01-01 - 2008-12-31 )
    • MS, Plant Ecology , institution ( 1993-01-01 - 1993-12-31 )
    • BS, Botany and Range , Plant Biotechnology, institution ( 1991-01-01 - 1991-12-31 )

    Memberships

    • Society of Herbarium Curators: ( - Present)
    • American Penstemon Society: ( - Present)
    • American Society of Plant Taxonomists: ( - Present)

    Courses Taught

    2020

    • BIO 235 : Section 001

    2019

    • BIO 559R: Section 014
    • BIO 235 : Section 002

    2018

    • BIO 235 : Section 002
    • BIO 494R: Section 009

    2017

    • BIO 235 : Section 001

    2016

    • BIO 235 : Section 002
    • BIO 494R: Section 010

    2015

    • BIO 235 : Section 002
    • BIO 494R: Section 010

    2014

    • BIO 235 : Section 002

    2013

    • BIO 235 : Section 002

    2008

    • PAS 301 : Section 001
    • PAS 301 : Section 002
    • PAS 301 : Section 003

    2007

    • PAS 210 : Section 001
    • PAS 302 : Section 001
    • PAS 302 : Section 002
    • PAS 301 : Section 001

    Publications

    • Crump WW, Stettler JM, Johnson RL, Anderson CD, Harrison S, Stevens LM, Stevens MR. June 5, 2020. Flower Color Variation in Jones’ Penstemon, Penstemon × jonesii Pennell (P eatonii A Gray × P laevis Pennell) (Plantaginaceae). 2nd ed.
    • Rodríguez-Peña RA, Johnson RL, Johnson LA, Anderson CD, Ricks NJ, Farley KM, Robbins MD, Wolfe AD, Stevens MR. September 5, 2018. Investigating the genetic diversity and differentiation patterns in the Penstemon scariosus species complex under different sample sizes using AFLPs and SSRs. 6th ed.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Yankee A, Anderson ZV. February 21, 2017. Seed Predation in Wild Populations of Chamisso Arnica (Arnica chamissonis Less: Asteraceae) and New Host Records for Campiglossa snowi (Hering) (Diptera: Tephritidae). 1st ed. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University.
    • Johnson RL, Stevens MR, Johnson LA, Robbins MD, Anderson CD, Ricks NJ, Farley KM. May 20, 2016. Molecular and morphological evidence for Penstemon luculentus (Plantaginaceae): a replacement name for Penstemon fremontii var glabrescens.
    • Stevens MR, Johnson RL. April (2nd Quarter/Spring), 2016. Annual APS Summer Meeting Rewards: Taxonomic clarification of two Penstemon species of the Uinta Basin of Colorado and Utah.
    • Stevens MR, Johnson RL. May, 2015. Breeding native flowers for drought tolerant urban landscapes: 2014 progress report.
    • Johnson LA, Johnson RL. June, 2006. Morphological delimitation and molecular evidence for allopolyploidy in Collomia wilkenii (Polemoniaceae), a new species from northern Nevada.

    Presentations

    • Stevens MR, Johnson RL, Meservey LM, Stettler JM, Anderson CD, Robbins MD, Johnson LA, Ricks NJ, Farley KM. Understanding the Penstemon scariosus complex. Utah Rare Plant Meeting. The Penstemon scariosus complex is found in the arid Uinta Basin and the surrounding mountainous region This species is currently divided into four varieties, albifluvis, cyanomontanus, garrettii, and scariosus Our study of the P scariosus complex found the present taxonomic keys misleading to use geography and morphological characteristics for delimiting varieties We used molecular data from 66 sets of fresh tissue sample and morphometric data from 180 herbarium sheets covering the entire range of all P scariosus varieties in this study We found that species determinations of herbarium samples were frequently based upon geographic location, as defined by current taxonomic keys However, when using the descriptive morphological traits described in those taxonomic keys, the varieties cyanomontanus, garrettii, and scariosus intermingled across the entire geographic range of all three varieties Furthermore, using molecular techniques, we found clear evidence of a genetically distinct population within the P scariosus complex Based on both molecular, and morphometric data, our current understating suggests that the P scariosus complex is best treated as two distinct species, P scarious and P albifluvis, and that P scariosus is comprised of two varieties (scariosus, and cyanomontanus) with var garrettii abandoned under synonymy with var scariosus Additionally, there is evidence of a possible third previously undescribed taxon that warrants further study. March, 2020.
    • Kunzelman JE, Anderson NV, Petersen SL, Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Impacts of commercial honeybees on native butterflies in high elevation meadows in Utah. Society For Range Management 2020 Annual Meetings. February, 2020.
    • Porter SJ, Johnson RL, Stettler JM, Stevens MR, Meservey L, Anderson CD, Johnson LA, Robbins MD, Ricks N. Molecular Characterization of White River Beardtongue, Penstemon scariosus var albifluvis. International Plant & Animal Genome XXVIII. Penstemon scariosus is a perennial plant species which thrives in the arid Uinta Basin region of the northern Colorado Plateau This species is currently divided into four varieties, P scariosus var albifluvis, P scariosus var cyanomontanus, P scariosus var garrettii, and P scariosus var scariosus Due to habitat destruction and fragmentation from oil and gas development and exploration, P scariosus var albifluvis is being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 At one point P scariosus var albifluvis was recognized as a distinct species but was reclassified to a variety of P scariosus based on similarities of plant morphology We hypothesize that P scariosus var albifluvis is reproductively isolated and genetically distinct from P scariosus To test this hypothesis, we collected tissue samples from 66 populations of currently recognized P scariosus varieties as well as four populations of P subglaber as an outlier We developed ten microsatellite markers for P scariosus and tested the allelic variation between these taxa Microsatellite data was analyzed using the program STRUCTURE to determine population structure We found evidence that P scariosus var albifluvis is genetically distinct from all other taxa and should be considered for reclassification as a species We also found another genetically distinct taxa within the P scariosus collections that is currently undescribed and found morphological and molecular evidence that P scariosus var cyanomontanus and P scariosus var garrettii are indistinguishable. January, 2020.
    • Anderson VJ, Johnson RL. Roughing up smooth brome with native plants: dominant to subordinate in montane meadows. Intermountain Native Plant Summit IX. November, 2019.
    • Bates TH, Anderson VJ, Johnson RL, Petersen SL, Flinders LA, Rooks D. Effects of Cattle Grazing on Population Densities and Reproductive Effort of Sclerocactus wrightiae. Utah Rare Plant Meeting. March, 2019.
    • Crump WW, Stettler JM, Johnson RL, Anderson CD, Harrison S, Stevens MR. The relationship between Penstemon × jonesii, P eatonii, and P laevis. Utah Rare Plant Meeting. First collected in 1894 by Marcus E Jones (1852–1934) and labelled as Penstemon glaber Pursh, Penstemon jonesii Pennell was not described until 1920 by Francis W Pennell (1882–1952) who used the 1894 M E Jones specimen as the holotype In 1967, Frank S Crosswhite (1940–2008) hypothesized that “it is indisputably the hybrid P laevis x P eatonii” It is now widely accepted as the putative natural hybrid of those two species and described as having “Tyrian rose”, “amaranth purple”, or red-purple to maroon colored blooms To date, it has only been identified in concentrated areas in Southwestern Utah Elizabeth Neese (1934–2008), in A Utah Flora, stated that this taxon has long been recognized as a candidate for horticultural selections due to its beautiful habit and color Research beyond its original description and hypothesized hybrid origins has been minimal Gaining a better understanding of its origins will help clarify lingering taxonomic questions surrounding P x jonesii We have made reciprocal first generation hybrid plants from the two parental species (P eatonii and P laevis); as well as second and third generation hybrids through backcrossing to both parental species Using nine Penstemon microsatellite markers we have examined the allelic variations between P x jonesii, P eatonii, and P laevis These SSR data, in conjunction with our controlled crosses suggest that P x jonesii indeed descends from hybridization events between P eatonii and P laevis However, the standing definition of P x jonesii is both myopic and misleading The first generation hybrid (F1) of these putative parents do not resemble P x jonesii The blossom color is a strong pink with its morphology slightly more in alignment with the characteristics of P laevis In our Zion National Park and Grand Staircase Escalante fieldwork, we have yet to identify, unambiguously, a true F1 of these putative parents However, when we backcrossed our F1 to either of the two parents (P eatonii, P laevis) we do find blossom colors and morphology described in all presently published descriptions along with additional undescribed colors also occurring in wild populations in Zion and Grand Staircase Escalante Both the controlled crosses and wild population blossom color range include purples, pinks, peach, and light oranges with hints of yellow The morphology of these blossoms generally more closely aligned with that of P eatonii Here, we propose a new, broader and more encompassing definition of P x jonesii, reflecting what is seen in the wild and our controlled hybrid cross experiments It is unclear to us as to why, in the wild populations, we generally found that the predominant floral colors of P x jonesii fall in “Tyrian rose”, “amaranth purple”, or red-purple to maroon colored blooms These predominate colors in the wild plants suggest some selective preference, perhaps a pollinator preference and/or increased fitness of plants with that color type. March, 2019.
    • Anderson N, Petersen SL, Anderson VJ, Johnson RL. Impacts on Native Pollinators in Response to Commercial Honey Bee Introductions. SER Europe Conference. September, 2018.
    • Johnson RL. Relating to Native Plants in Wildscapes and Landscapes: Rhymes and Reasons III . Utah Native Plant Society. December, 2017.
    • Johnson RL. Relating to Native Plants in Wildscapes and Landscapes: Rhymes and Reasons II . American Penstemon Society Conference. June, 2017.
    • Anderson NV, Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Impacts on native bee populations exposed to domestic honey bee introductions. Society For Range Management Annual Meeting. February, 2017.
    • Johnson RL. Relating to Native Plants in Wildscapes and Landscapes: Rhymes and Reasons I. Annual Central Utah Penstemon Festival. 2016.
    • Stevens MR, Harrison S, Ensign B, Robbins MD, Johnson RL, Johnson LA, Anderson CD, Ricks NJ, Farley KM. Breeding native flowers for drought tolerant urban landscapes: 2016 progress report. Annual WERA Meetings. October, 2016.
    • Ricks NJ, Stevens MR, Johnson RL, Johnson LA, Anderson CD, Robbins MD, Farley KM. The development and use of SSR markers for Penstemon scariosus, a species with horticultural potential. American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Conference. Penstemon scariosus var scariosus is horticulturally interesting because of its rather large showy blossoms, and its attractive emerald to dark green and somewhat compact foliage found in plants from some accessions Furthermore, this perennial plant has potential in xeric urban landscapes of the western US because it flourishes in arid and desolate environments at higher altitudes Finally, P scariosus var albifluvis is being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to recovery of hydrocarbon deposits located at sites where this variety is almost exclusively found Thus, the horticultural potential of var scariosus and the rarity of var albifluvis underlie the importance of understanding of the phylogenetic relationship within P scariosus To do so, we developed a set of ten new SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers specifically to study this species These markers were identified using a genomic reduction protocol in combination with next-generation sequencing of P scariosus Besides these ten markers, we tested all previously reported Penstemon SSRs and identified six additional markers that were robust, reliable, and polymorphic across a subset of 27 accessions including all four varieties of P scariosus and eight closely related taxa Of these 16 markers we selected ten that combined well together when labeled with either NED (yellow), 6-FAM (blue), or HEX (green) utilizing the ABI 3730xl with Gene Scan 500 ROX Size Standard We utilized those ten markers to test the individual samples of our collected 76 accessions The results of this study indicate that one taxon (P fremontii var glabrescens) is genetically distinct from P fremontii and was elevated to its own species Additionally, our data suggests that P scariosus var albifluvis is genetically independent and unique compared to the rest of the P scariosus varieties The intraspecific phylogenetic relationships morphological distinction of three remaining varieties of P scariosus (var cyanomontanus, garrettii, and scariosus) are less clear. August, 2016.
    • Rodriguez-Pena RR, Wolfe AD, Robbins MD, Johnson RL, Johnson LA, Anderson CD, Ricks NJ, Farley KM, Stevens MR. Population genetics and geographic patterns among varieties of Penstemon scariosus. Botanical Society of America Annual Conference. August, 2016.
    • Stevens MR, Johnson RL, Stettler JM. Morphological and genetic characterization of blue penstemon (Penstemon cyaneus). Joint Annual Meeting of the SER-Great Basin Chapter and the Great Basin Native Plant Project. April, 2016.
    • Stevens MR, Johnson RL, Johnson LA, Robbins MD, Anderson CD, Ricks NJ, Farley KM. Unraveling the Penstemon scariosus complex using molecular markers – an update. Annual Utah Rare Plant Meeting. Penstemon scariosus Pennell is recognized as having a broad, complex range of morphological variability There are four botanical varieties of P scariosus recognized in the taxonomic key ‘A Utah Flora’ which are albifluvis, cyanomontanus, garrettii, and scariosus Of these, var albifluvis (White River beardtongue) is described as the most distinct in that treatment This taxon is found exclusively in northeastern Utah and slightly over the adjacent border of Colorado in Green River shale geological formations near the White River We have collected tissue samples from across the entire geographic range of P scariosus Variety albifluvis is geographically isolated from the three other varieties of P scariosus Because of its unique, limited habitat and the increasing efforts to recover hydrocarbons found in its surrounding geological formation, P scariosus var albifluvis has been and is currently being studied as a candidate taxon for listing under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 Understanding how unique P scariosus var albifluvis is compared to the other P scariosus varieties, as well as learning what the genetic relationships are within this taxon, are fundamental questions in this issue The objective of our study is to understand how each of these taxa interrelate to each other using ten molecular markers known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or also known as microsatellite markers Additionally, we would like to understand how P fremontii var glabrescens, from the Piceance Canyon, Rio Blanco Co, CO area relates to P scariosus Several specimens of P fremontii var glabrescens in the Brigham Young University Stanley L Welsh Herbarium from multiple collectors were mislabeled as P scariosus, which caused confusion in our early studies of P scariosus Our preliminary data clearly indicate that P scariosus var albifluvis falls within the broader taxon of P scariosus; but our data also suggest that it is distinct from the rest of the species Our data also clearly indicate that P fremontii var glabrescens is its own taxon distinct from P scariosus and P fremontii. March, 2016.
    • Johnson RL. Biological research collections and their relevance in the 21st century. BYU Biology Department Graduate Seminar. February, 2016.
    • Stevens MR, Harrison S, Ensign B, Johnson RL. Progress report of diversity studies and interspecific hybridization in Penstemon. Annual WERA Meetings. October, 2015.
    • Johnson RL, Sadler C, Nufer J, Sanders K, Johnson LA. Physical and digital renovation of the vascular plant herbarium at Brigham Young University. Botany 2015. July, 2015.
    • Johnson RL, Yankee A, Johnson LA. Efforts to characterize the Penstemon scariosus complex; and a look at post-Lake Bonneville endemism in plants. Annual Utah Rare Plant Meeting. March, 2015.
    • Anderson VJ, Fugal R, Davies K, Johnson RL, Doan JB, Vernon JL. Impacts of Juniper and sagebrush chaining on surface lithic scatters. Utah Chapter of Wildlife Society. March, 2015.
    • Stevens MR, Johnson RL, Geary BD. Breeding native flowers for drought tolerant urban landscapes; 2014 progress report. Annual WERA Meetings. October, 2014.
    • Nelson CR, Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. A comparison of robber fly (Diptera: Asilidae) communities found in native and non-native plant associations in the Great Basin of western North America. 8th International Congress of Dipterology. A comparison of robber fly (Diptera: Asilidae) communities found in native and non-native plant associations in the Great Basin of western North America C Riley Nelson1, Robert L Johnson1, and Val J Anderson2 We inventoried robber fly composition (Diptera: Asilidae) at three sites in the eastern Great Basin of western North America Plant communities in these vast habitats often consist of Utah juniper woodland, sagebrush shrubland, cheatgrass grassland, and crested wheatgrass grassland Juniper woodland and sagebrush shrubland are native associations in the region while cheatgrass grassland is a more annually timed invasive community that often establishes after fire or severe grazing pressure Crested wheatgrass, a non-native bunchgrass is often planted in disturbed sites (after fire or severe grazing) to stabilize the abiotic habitat and allow reestablishment of more native biotic associations as a bridge species We sampled these four communities where they were contiguous in three widely separated locations using malaise traps evenly arranged across the sample area A total of 2,438 robber flies were collected from the traps over the course of two years We identified the asilids as belonging to 24 genera and 58 species Composition was significantly different between all habitat types with the greatest diversity occurring in juniper woodlands, followed by sagebrush, cheatgrass, and crested wheatgrass Thus the native woody communities were richer than the non-native grasslands The conversion of native habitats to cheatgrass favors robber flies in the genus Dicropaltum but that preference is not found in the superficially similar grassland community dominated by crested wheatgrass Other patterns in the robber fly communities will be explored as well The enhanced richness and abundance of robber flies in native juniper woodlands and sagebrush shrubland compared to the two exotic grassland systems sheds light on their contribution towards regional biodiversity in this faunal group overlooked by land managers and researchers 1Department of Biology and Monte L Bean Museum, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 USA 2Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 USA email: rileynelson@byuedu; robert_johnson@byuedu; val_anderson@byuedu . August, 2014.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Yankee A. Host relationships between Arnica chamissonis Less (Asteraceae) and fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae). Botany 2014. Capitula of Arnica chamissonis Less are known to host eight different species of fruit flies from the family Tephritidae Three of those species are knew host records not previously published We report a new host record for Campiglossa snowi (Hering, Tephritis leavittensis Blanc, and Trupanea nigricornis (Coquillett) on A chamissonis C snowi was the only fruit fly reared from A chamissonis from 3 different population over 5 sample years from the Kenai Peninusla, Alaska A total of 1,114 specimens of C snowi were reared from the flowerheads of 337 plants averaging 5 flower heads per plant Seed damage from fly larvae ranged from an average of 0-548% per capitulum with an overall average of 183% across all years and sites Infestation rates for individual capitula and the entire plant were 564% and 790% across all years and sites respectively The duration of the study revealed that seed damage and corresponding fly abundance peaked around 2010 with substantially lower values in years preceding and following the peak. July, 2014.
    • Goates ED, Brabazon H, Johnson RL, Gowen D, Johnson LA. More than meets the eye: hidden diversity in Navarretia section Masonia (Polemoniaceae). Botany 2014. July, 2014.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Gardner ET, Nelson CR. Use of Utah juniper and sagebrush vs cheatgrass and crested wheatgrass habitats by mini-predators – robberflies (Asilidae). Intermountain Native Plant Summit VII. March, 2013.
    • Johnson RL, Syzdek D. Population Status of the Endangered Moapa Dace of Warm Springs. Annual Conference, Nevada Water Resources Association. 2012.
    • Johnson RL. Restoration and Preservation of the Warm Springs Natural Area, the Environmental Cost of Doing Business. 2012.
    • Johnson RL. The Role of Entomology in Modern Land Management. West Career and Technical Academy. 2012.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson NV, Fugal RA, Anderson VJ. Cultivation Practices to maximize seed yield for three shrub species commonly used for wildlife habitat improvement projects. Annual Conference of The Wildlife Society. 2011.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson ZV, Anderson VJ. Seed predation by an undescribed species of fruit fly (Campiglossa spp) on Arnica chamisonis . Annual Conference of The Wildlife Society. 2011.
    • Johnson RL, Sharp J. Affects of Rotenone on Aquatic Invertebrates within the Warm Springs Natural Area, Moapa, Nevada. Annual Conference, Nevada Water Resources Association. 2011.
    • Johnson RL. Contributions of Restoration at the Warm Springs Natural Area Toward Moapa Dace Recovery. Annual Conference, Nevada Water Resources Association. 2011.
    • Johnson RL. Protection Efforts of the Moapa Dace. Annual Conference, Nevada Water Resources Association. 2010.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson ZV, Walker R, Fugal RA, Anderson VJ. Uses of the herbicide "JOURNEY" in cultivated seed production of plants useful in habitat restoration. Annual Meetings of the Utah Chapter of the Wildlife Society. 2010.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Aquatic Habitat Restoration at the Warn Springs Natural Area (Moapa, Nevada): Letting Go of More than a Century of Grazing and Recreational Use. 19th World Conference of the Society for Ecological Restoration International. 2009.
    • Johnson RL, Doyle C. Restoring habitat for the endangered Moapa dace, Moapa coriacea, in the Warm Springs system, Muddy River, Nevada. American Fisheries Society, Western Division Annual Meeting. 2009.
    • Johnson RL, JJ. The Purpose of Warm Springs Natural Area and Management Implications for the Southern Nevada Water Authority. Annual Conference, Nevada Water Resources Association. 2009.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Clark SM. Comparisons of Bee Diversity between Contiguous Stands of Pinyon/Juniper, Sagebrush, Crested Wheatgrass, and Cheatgrass in the Eastern Great Basin. Joint Meeting of the Society for Range Management and the AMerican Forage and Grassland Council. 2008.
    • Johnson RL, Gardner ET, Anderson VJ. Terrestrial arthropod community composition as an indicator of restoration success in a semi-arid shrub-steppe . Joint Meeting of the Society for Range Management and the AMerican Forage and Grassland Council. 2008.
    • Johnson RL. Attributes of Marketable Native Plants and Native Plants in the Marketplace. Annual Intermountain Native Plant Growers Association. 2007.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Influences on Wildflower Seed Yields by Row Spacing and Mulching Practices, and Improving Seed Production in Wild Populations for Seed Harvesting. Native Wildflower Seed Production Research Symposium. 2007.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Controlling insect seed damage in wildland composite populations in the Intermountain West. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2007.
    • Johnson RL, Roberts L, Anderson VJ. Investigations into seed collecting practices and stand manipulation to maintain seed production in wildland populations of antelope bitterbrush and Wyoming big sagebrush. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2007.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Maximization of Great Basin wildland forb seed production using variations of cultural practices. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2007.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Estimates of seed production loss in wild plants populations by capitivorous fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae). 90th Annual Meeting for Pacific Branch Entomological Society of America. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Gardner E, Anderson VJ. Effect of fire-induced cheatgrass invasion and subsequent land rehabilitation on diversity of ants and Tenebrionid beetles in a semi-arid shrub steppe. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Voss J, Anderson VJ. Effect of three rates of five different herbicides on seven native forbs at various growth stages. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Judson M, Anderson VJ. Effects of between row spacing and irrigation timing on seed production of four native forbs from the Uncompahgre Plateau . Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Richards E, Anderson VJ. Maintenance of population variability in rare plant species during seed increase for restoration. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Reduction in seed yields of forbs from native stands due to seed predation by fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae). Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Roberts L, Anderson VJ. Shrub stand manipulations to improve seed production in antelope bitterbrush in Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Armstrong J, Anderson VJ. Shrub stand manipulations to improve seed production in Wyoming big sagebrush in Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson ZV, Anderson VJ. Tolerance of five perennial rangeland grasses to tow rates and tow dormant season application times of the herbicide Journey. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Taylor BG, Anderson VJ, Roundy BA. Two year evaluation of cultural practices on seed production of select native forbs. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Insects: the other wildlife. Utah Section, Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2006.
    • Johnson RL, Miller S, Nelson CR, Burton G, Hatch G, Cutler E. Value added on the road: enhancing the honors classroom experience. 32nd Annual Conference of the Western Regional Honors Council. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Voss J. Herbicide resistance of select forbs native to the Great Basin. BASF 2005 Technical Interchange. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Weed Control and Perennial Plant Tolerance to Plateau and Journey. BASF 2005 Technical Interchange. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VL. Implementation of an Experimental Design to Measure the Effect of Row Spacing and Irrigation on Seed Production of Four Forbs Species from the Uncompahgre Plateau. Ecology and Management of Pinyon Juniper and Sagebrush Communities Conference. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Coleman JK, Anderson VJ. The effect of seeding depth and soil type on emergence and seedling vigor of 8 forbs. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Roundy BA. Investigations into cultural practices to raise native forbs. The National Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Gardner E, Anderson VJ. Effect of fire-induced cheatgrass invasion and land reclamation on ground dwelling arthropod populations. The Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Armstrong JC, Anderson VJ. Environmentally induced dormancy in Bromus tectorum . The Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Roberts FL, Anderson VJ. The effect of seven herbicides on eight native rangeland forbs in greenhouse trials. The Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Taylor B, Anderson VJ, Roundy B. Cultural practices on seed production of three Sphaeralcea species. Utah Section of the Society for Range Management 2005 Annual Conference. 2005.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Herbicide Effect on Seed Germination, Seedlings, and Mature Plants on Select Native Species, and Affects of Soil Type and Seeding Depth on the Emergence of Select Native Species. Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Roundy B. Native Plant Research for Restoration Application. Intermountain Native Plant Summit III. 2004.
    • Krebs TM, Nelson CR, Johnson RL. Invertebrate wildlife at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah: historical lists with new inventories for robber flies and bee flies (Insecta: Diptera: Asilidae and Bombyliidae). 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Nelson CR. Pandora's Stump; A Look at Fungus Gnat (Mycetophilidae) Diversity in the Great Basin. National Entomological Society Meeting. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Nelson M, Nelson CR. Pandora's stump: Diversity of Mycetophilidae in the Great Basin of North America Symposium, North American Dipterists Society Annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Nelson CR. Approaches to invertebrate sampling for assessing habitat health and use of bioindicators. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Gardner E, Anderson VJ. Effect of fire-induced cheatgrass invasion and subsequent land reclamation on arthropod diversity in a semi-arid shrub steppe. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Armstrong JC, Anderson VJ. Environmentally induced dormancy in Bromus tectorum and seedbanking dynamics . Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Voss J, Anderson VJ. Response of established plants of native forbs to varied rates of 7 herbicides. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Marchant LH, Anderson VJ. Seedling response of several native forbs to varied rates of 7 herbicides. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Krebs T, Anderson VJ. The effect of seeding depth and soil type on emergence and seedling vigor of 6 forbs. Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Hardin P. Research Update on Early Detection of Squarrose Knapweed Using a Low Altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. Squarrose Knapweed Demonstration Weed Management Area Annual Meeting. 2004.
    • Johnson RL, Krebs T, Nelson CR. Invertebrate Wildlife of Dugway Proving Ground, Utah: Historical Lists with new Inventories for Robberflies and Beeflies (Insecta: Diptera: Asilidae and Bombyliidae). Wildlife Society, Utah Chapter. 2004.
    • Johnson RL. Drought Tolerant Woody Species for Utah. Utah Green Conference. 2003.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. An Exploration in Monitoring Methods for Smokes and Obscurants. National Integrated Training Area Management Conference . 2001.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Cheatgrass Die-off in Western Utah . Society for Range Management, National Meetings. 2001.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Development of a Revised LCTA Sampling Design at Dugway Proving Ground. National Integrated Training Area Management Conference . 2000.
    • Johnson RL, Anderson VJ. Effect of Linear Scalping and Prescribed Burning on Seeded Grass in Cheatgrass Infested Rangelands. Society for Range Management, National Meetings. 2000.
    • Johnson RL. Challenges Facing Growers of Intermountain Natives. Utah Native Plant Forum. 1999.
    • Johnson RL. Propagation on Native Plants. Utah Native Plant Symposium . 1998.
    Robert Johnson