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Steve Petersen

Professor
Plant & Wildlife Sciences

5027 LSB
Provo, UT 84602

Biography

Teaching Interests


I currently teach four courses in the Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences: Forest Management and Ecology (PWS 419), Rangeland Planning and GIS (PWS 417), Rangeland Landscape Ecology and GIS (PWS 512), and Environmental Biology (PWS 150). I taught BIO 100 for 7 years (2008-2014) and Wildlife Law Enforcement (PWS 324) for 2 years.

Research Interests


My research emphasizes the spatial and temporal dynamics of rangeland ecosystems, plant community dynamics and animal – habitat interactions. I utilize geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technology to answer ecological questions. I am currently working in seven areas of wildland spatial ecology, rangeland ecology and management, and forest ecology and management.

Experience

Professional

  • Associate Professor, Brigham Young University, 2012-Present
  • Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University, 2007-2012
  • Assistant Professor, Oregon State University, 2005-2006
  • Facutly Instructor, Oregon State University, 2004-2005
  • Ecologist / Scientist II, Science Application International Corporation, Las Vegas, NV, 1997-1999
  • Biological Technician, Peregrine Inc., 1995-1995

Government

  • Seasonal Technician, Bryce Canyon National Park, 1994-1996
  • Seasonal Technician, Dixie National Forest, 1993-1993

Academic - P-12

  • Research Technician, Brigham Young University, 1992-1992

Memberships

  • Society for Conservation GIS, 2013-Present
  • The Wildlife Society, 2012-Present
  • Society for Range Management, 1997-Present
  • International Association for Landscape Ecology, 2002-2008
  • American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, 2001-2005
  • Society for Ecological Restoration, 1998-2000

Honors & Awards

  • College of Life Sciences, Brigham Young University : Outstanding Teaching Award
  • Society for Range Management : Early Career Teaching Award
  • Brigham Young University : Young Scholar Award
  • Society for Range Management Annual Conference, SLC, Utah : 2nd place Ph.D. Oral Presenation competition.
  • Oregon State University : Department of Rangeland Resources OutstandingDoctoral Student of the Year award
  • Oregon State University : First Place Ph.D. Award for the University Graduate Student Conference Science poster competition
  • Society for Range Management, Kona, Hawaii : 1st place Oral Presentation Competition

Courses Taught

Winter 2019

  • IAS 201R: Cultural Survey Section 050
  • PWS 150: Environmental Biology Section 002
  • PWS 390R: Special Topics Section 003
  • PWS 417: Rangeland Planning & GIS Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Mentored Learning Experience Section 009, 032, 022
  • PWS 598R: Adv Topics in PWS Section 007
  • PWS 699R: Master's Thesis Section 009
  • PWS 799R: Doctoral Dissertation Section 002

Fall 2018

  • PWS 390R: Special Topics Section 004
  • PWS 419: Forest Management & Ecology Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Mentored Learning Experience Section 010, 022
  • PWS 699R: Master's Thesis Section 009
  • PWS 799R: Doctoral Dissertation Section 001

Summer 2018

  • PWS 699R: Master's Thesis Section 001
  • PWS 799R: Doctoral Dissertation Section 004

Spring 2018

  • PWS 699R: Master's Thesis Section 005

Research Interests

My research emphasizes the spatial and temporal dynamics of rangeland ecosystems, plant community dynamics and animal – habitat interactions. I utilize geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technology to answer ecological questions. I am currently working in seven areas of wildland spatial ecology, rangeland ecology and management, and forest ecology and management.

Teaching Interests

I currently teach four courses in the Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences: Forest Management and Ecology (PWS 419), Rangeland Planning and GIS (PWS 417), Rangeland Landscape Ecology and GIS (PWS 512), and Environmental Biology (PWS 150). I taught BIO 100 for 7 years (2008-2014) and Wildlife Law Enforcement (PWS 324) for 2 years.

Honors and Awards

  • Outstanding Teaching Award
  • Early Career Teaching Award
  • Young Scholar Award
  • 2nd place Ph.D. Oral Presenation competition.
  • Department of Rangeland Resources Outstanding Doctoral Student of the Year award
  • First Place Ph.D. Award for the University Graduate Student Conference Science poster competition
  • 1st place Oral Presentation Competition

Memberships

  • Society for Conservation GIS: ( - Present)
  • The Wildlife Society: ( - Present)
  • Society for Range Management: ( - Present)
  • International Association for Landscape Ecology: ( - Present)
  • American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing: ( - Present)
  • Society for Ecological Restoration: ( - Present)

Professional Citizenship

  • Committee/Council Member, Humane Society of America, 2016-10-01 - 2016-10-31 - Present
  • Committee/Council Member, Society for Range Management, 2016-04-01 - 2016-04-30 - Present
  • Committee/Council Member, Society for Range Management, 2016-01-01 - 2016-01-31 - Present
  • Reviewer, Ad Hoc Reviewer, Peer Reviewer for Professional Journals, 2007-01-01 - 2007-12-31 - Present
  • Committee/Council Member, National Academy of Science, 2011-09-01 - 2011-09-30 - 2013-12-01 - 2013-12-31
  • Committee/Council Chair, Society for Range Management, 2011-02-01 - 2011-02-28 - 2012-02-01 - 2012-02-28
  • Committee/Council Chair, SRM Wildlife Habitat Committee, 2008-01-01 - 2008-12-31 - 2009-01-01 - 2009-12-31
  • Officer, SRM Utah Chapter Student Liason, 2007-01-01 - 2007-12-31 - 2008-01-01 - 2008-12-31
  • Officer, SRM Wildlife Habitat Committee, 2007-01-01 - 2007-12-31 - 2008-01-01 - 2008-12-31

Courses Taught

2020

  • PWS 799R: Section 006
  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 018
  • PWS 598R: Section 006
  • PWS 799R: Section 002
  • PWS 150 : Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 022
  • PWS 417 : Section 001
  • PWS 390R: Section 003

2019

  • PWS 598R: Section 007
  • PWS 799R: Section 001
  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 292R: Section 019
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 010
  • PWS 494R: Section 030
  • PWS 494R: Section 022
  • PWS 512 : Section 001
  • PWS 697R: Section 013
  • PWS 150 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Section 011
  • PWS 494R: Section 027
  • PWS 699R: Section 005
  • PWS 494R: Section 010
  • PWS 598R: Section 007
  • IAS 201R: Section 050
  • PWS 799R: Section 002
  • PWS 150 : Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 032
  • PWS 494R: Section 022
  • PWS 417 : Section 001
  • PWS 390R: Section 003

2018

  • PWS 799R: Section 001
  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 010
  • PWS 494R: Section 022
  • PWS 390R: Section 004
  • PWS 799R: Section 004
  • PWS 699R: Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 005
  • IAS 201R: Section 056
  • PWS 799R: Section 002
  • PWS 150 : Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 010
  • PWS 417 : Section 001

2017

  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 10
  • PWS 494R: Section 023
  • PWS 512 : Section 001
  • PWS 598R: Section 002
  • PWS 598R: Section 6
  • PWS 598R: Section 8
  • PWS 150 : Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 011
  • PWS 494R: Section 028
  • PWS 417 : Section 001
  • PWS 697R: Section 6

2016

  • PWS 598R: Section 001
  • PWS 598R: Section 007
  • PWS 598R: Section 6
  • PWS 598R: Section 8
  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 010
  • PWS 494R: Section 025
  • PWS 598R: Section 002
  • PWS 799R: Section 10
  • PWS 150 : Section 002
  • PWS 494R: Section 011
  • PWS 494R: Section 022
  • PWS 417 : Section 001

2015

  • PWS 799R: Section 1
  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 9
  • PWS 494R: Section 010
  • PWS 494R: Section 25
  • PWS 512 : Section 001
  • PWS 799R: Section 013
  • PWS 699R: Section 025
  • PWS 598R: Section 009
  • PWS 799R: Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 011
  • PWS 494R: Section 022
  • PWS 417 : Section 001
  • PWS 324 : Section 001

2014

  • PWS 799R: Section 001
  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 010
  • PWS 494R: Section 011
  • BIO 100 : Section 009
  • PWS 150 : Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 025
  • PWS 494R: Section 048
  • PWS 494R: Section 049
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 494R: Section 012
  • PWS 598R: Section 009
  • IAS 201R: Section 036
  • PWS 699R: Section 010
  • PWS 494R: Section 023
  • BIO 100 : Section 014
  • PWS 417 : Section 001

2013

  • PWS 699R: Section 010
  • BIO 100 : Section 003
  • PWS 512 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 003
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 490 : Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 011
  • PWS 494R: Section 025
  • PWS 494R: Section 024
  • PWS 417 : Section 001
  • PWS 697R: Section 006
  • PWS 424 : Section 001

2012

  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 419 : Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 010
  • BIO 100 : Section 004
  • BIO 100 : Section 037
  • PWS 699R: Section 003
  • PWS 699R: Section 009
  • PWS 699R: Section 011
  • PWS 494R: Section 014
  • PWS 494R: Section 025
  • BIO 100 : Section 008
  • PWS 417 : Section 001
  • PWS 390R: Section 002

2011

  • PWS 699R: Section 011
  • PWS 494R: Section 012
  • BIO 100 : Section 004
  • PWS 512 : Section 001
  • PWS 390R: Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 011
  • PWS 494R: Section 028
  • PWS 494R: Section 025
  • PWS 417 : Section 001

2010

  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 419 : Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 011
  • BIO 100 : Section 001
  • PWS 697R: Section 007
  • PWS 699R: Section 003
  • PWS 699R: Section 011
  • PWS 417 : Section 001

2009

  • PWS 799R: Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 011
  • PWS 494R: Section 012
  • PWS 494R: Section 024
  • BIO 100 : Section 001
  • PWS 512 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 003
  • PWS 699R: Section 013
  • PWS 494R: Section 017
  • BIO 494R: Section 026

2008

  • PWS 598R: Section 004
  • PWS 799R: Section 002
  • PWS 419 : Section 001
  • PWS 419 : Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 012
  • PWS 494R: Section 027
  • BIO 100 : Section 021
  • BIOL 100 : Section 021
  • PWS 540R: Section 002
  • PAS 598R: Section 003
  • PAS 699R: Section 013
  • PAS 598R: Section 001

2007

  • PAS 598R: Section 006
  • PAS 799R: Section 002
  • PAS 417 : Section 001
  • INBIO 419 : Section 001
  • INBIO 419 : Section 002
  • PAS 417: Section 1
  • PAS 440 : Section 001

Publications

  • Ortiz-Cano H, Hernandez-Herrera JA, Hansen NC, Petersen SL, Searcy MT, Mata-Gonzalez R, Cervantes-Mendivil T, Villanueva-Morales A, Park P, Stewart JR. September, 2020. Pre-Columbian rock mulching as a strategy for modern Agave cultivation in arid marginal lands.
  • Louhaichi M, Belgacem AO, Petersen SL, SH. November 18, 2019. Effects of climate change and grazing pressure on shrub communities of west Asian rangelands. 5th ed.
  • Richardson WC, Badrakh T, Roundy BA, Aanderud ZT, Petersen SL, Allen PS, Whitaker DR, Madsen MD. July (3rd Quarter/Summer), 2019. Influence of an abscisic acid (ABA) seed coating on seed germination rate and timing of bluebunch wheatgrass. 13th ed.
  • Landeen M, Kitchen SG, Petersen SL, Flinders LA. May, 2019. Non-destructive age estimation of mountain big sagebrush using morphological characteristics. 3rd ed.
  • Louhaichi M, Hassan S, Missaoui AM, Ates S, Petersen SL, Niane AA, Slim S, Belgacem AO. February 12, 2019. The impact of bracteole removal and seedling rate: implications for rangeland rehabilitation in dry areas. 1st ed.
  • Beever EA, Simberloff D, Crowley SL, Al-Chokhachy R, Jackson HA, Petersen SL. February 4, 2019. Conservation Challenges arising from social-ecological mismatches in introduced species management. FEE18-0176th ed.
  • Beever EA, Huntsinger L, Petersen SL. October (4th Quarter/Autumn), 2018. Conservation challenges emerging from free-roaming horse management: a vexing social-ecological mismatch.
  • Howell RG, Petersen SL. October (4th Quarter/Autumn), 2017. A comparison of change detection measurements using object-based and pixel-based classification methods on western juniper dominated woodlands in Eastern Oregon.
  • Zvirzdin DL, Roundy BA, Barney NS, Petersen SL, Anderson VJ, Madsen MD. July (3rd Quarter/Summer) 4, 2017. Postfire soil water repellency in piñon–juniper woodlands: Extent, severity, and thickness relative to ecological site characteristics and climate. 13th ed.
  • Landeen ML, Flinders LA, Kitchen SG, Petersen SL. May, 2017. Seed production estimation for mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp vaseyana).
  • Gooch AJ, Petersen SL, Collins GH, Smith TS, McMillan BR, Eggett DL. February, 2017. The impacts of feral horses on the use of water by pronghorn in the Great Basin.
  • Boswell A, Petersen SL, Roundy BA, Jensen RR, Summers D, Hulet A. January (1st Quarter/Winter) 6, 2017. Rangeland monitoring using remote sensing: comparison of cover estimates from field measurements and image analysis. 1st ed.
  • Petersen SL, Nicholes BK, Frey N, Heaton K, Eggett DL. December, 2016. Response of greater sage-grouse to surface coal mining and habitat conservation in association with the mine.
  • Westover MW, Larsen RT, Baxter RJ, Day CC, Jensen RR, Petersen SL. 2016. Assessing Greater Sage-Grouse selection of brood-rearing habitat using remotely-sensed imagery: Can readily available high-resolution imagery be used to identify brood-rearing habitat across a broad landscape?.
  • Roundy DB, Hulet A, Roundy BA, Jensen RR, Hinkle JB, Crook L, Petersen SL. 2016. Estimating pinyon and juniper cover across Utah using NAIP imagery.
  • Roundy BA, Farmer M, Olson J, Petersen SL, Nelson DR, Davis J, Vernon J. 2016. Runoff and sediment response to tree control and seeding on a high erosion potential site in Utah: evidence for reversal of an abiotic threshold. 2016th ed.
  • Freese M, Petersen SL, Miller RF, Yost AC, Robinson WD. May, 2016. Spatial analysis of greater sage-grouse habitat use in relation to landscape level habitat structure.
  • Madsen MD, Zvirzdin DL, Petersen SL, Hopkins BG, Roundy BA. May, 2015. Anchor chaining’s influence on soil hydrology and seeding success in burned pinon-juniper woodlands. 3rd ed.
  • Hulet A, Roundy BA, Petersen SL, Jensen RR, Bunting SC. 2014. Cover estimations using object-based image analysis rule sets developed across multiple scales in pinyon and juniper woodlands . Denver, CO: Society for Range management.
  • Hulet A, Roundy BA, Petersen SL, Jensen RR, Bunting S. September, 2014. Utilizing National Agricultural Image Program data to estimate tree cover and biomass of piñon and juniper woodlands . Denver, CO: Society for Range management.
  • Collins GA, Petersen SL, Carr CA, Pielstick L. September, 2014. Testing GPS/VHF collar design and safety in the study of free-roaming horses. 9(8):e103189th ed.
  • Kaze J, Petersen SL, Larsen RT, Baxter RJ. January (1st Quarter/Winter), 2014. Utah Sage-grouse habitat predictive modeling and Diamond population monitoring project.
  • Gillette G, Coates PS, Petersen SL, Romero JP. December, 2013. Can reliable sage-grouse lek counts be obtained using aerial infrared technology?. 2nd ed.
  • Hulet A, Roundy BA, Petersen SL, Jensen RR, Bunting S. 2013. Assessing the relationship between ground measurements and object-based image analysis of land cover classes in pinyon-juniper woodlands.
  • Madsen MD, Petersen SL, Fernelius KJ, Roundy BA, Taylor AG, Hopkins BG. September, 2012. Influence of soil water repellency on seedling emergence and plant survival in a burned semi-arid woodland.
  • Madsen MD, Petersen SL, Roundy BA, Taylor AG, Hopkins BG. March, 2012. Comparison of post-fire soil water repellency amelioration strategies on bluebunch wheatgrass and cheatgrass survival. 2nd ed. Wheat Ridge, CO: Society of Range Management.
  • Boyd C, Petersen SL, Gilgert W, Rogers R, Fuhlendorf S, Larsen RT, Wolfe D, Jensen KC, Gonzales P, Dahlgren D, et alDecember, 2011. Looking toward a brighter future for lekking grouse.
  • Madsen MD, Zvirzden DL, Petersen SL, Roundy BA, Hopkins BG, Chandler DG. October (4th Quarter/Autumn), 2011. Soil water repellency within a burned piñon-juniper woodland: spatial distribution, severity, and ecohydrologic implications . Madison, WI: Soil Science Society of America.
  • Bruce JR, Robinson WD, Petersen SL, Miller RF. November, 2011. Greater sage-grouse movement and habitat use during winter in Central Oregon.
  • Madsen MD, Zvirzden DL, Davis BD, Petersen SL, Roundy BA. May, 2011. Feature extraction techniques for measuring piñon and juniper tree cover and density, and comparison with field-based surveys.
  • Balzotti CS, Petersen SL, Terry RE, Golding C. July (3rd Quarter/Summer), 2010. Remote Sensing as a Tool for Tropical Ecology. 8th ed.

Presentations

  • Morris J, Petersen SL, Lawrence RC. Biotic causes of seedling mortality for Elymus elymoides (Raf) Swezey in a drill-seeded rangeland environment. Society for Range Management. February, 2020.
  • Anderson N, Anderson VJ, Petersen SL, Bates T. Gauging floral resources for pollinators using high resolution drone imagery. Society for Range Management. February, 2020.
  • Knighton L, Myrick M, Petersen SL. Hydrologic and biologic responses of anthropogenically altered springs to restoration in the Great Basin. Society for Range Management. February, 2020.
  • Petersen SL, Howell R. The application of geospatial technology to assess pinyon/juniper invasion in western rangelands. Society for Range Management. February, 2020.
  • Kunzelman JE, Anderson NV, Petersen SL, Johnson RL, Anderson VJ, Impacts of commercial honeybees on native butterflies in high elevation meadows in Utah. Society For Range Management 2020 Annual Meetings. February, 2020.
  • Morris JR, Petersen SL. Biotic causes of seedling mortality for the native species, bottlebrush squirreltail (Elymus elymoides), in a reseeded rangeland environment. Society for Range Management. November, 2019.
  • McGinn MC, Petersen SL. Greater sage-grouse habitat influences in free-roaming horse areas. Society for Range Management. November, 2019.
  • Knighton L, Petersen SL. Hydrologic and biologic response to restoration of anthropogenically altered springs in the Great Basin. Society for Range Management. November, 2019.
  • Heaton K, Frey N, Petersen SL. Open pit coal mining in southern Utah: the science and success of reclamation activities. Society for Range Management. November, 2019.
  • Petersen SL. Use of GPS collars and geospatial technology to evaluate horse habitat use in western United States. 2nd International Wild Equid Conference. September, 2019.
  • Bates TH, Anderson VJ, Johnson RL, Petersen SL, Flinders LA, Rooks D. Effects of Cattle Grazing on Population Densities and Reproductive Effort of Sclerocactus wrightiae. Utah Rare Plant Meeting. March, 2019.
  • Petersen SL, Howell R, Rogers P, Jackson MW, Balzotti C. Spatial bibliography of rangeland resources using ArcGIS online. Society for Range Management. February, 2019.
  • Fulton C, Petersen SL, Howell R, Anderson VJ. Use of sUAS technology in the manipulation of cattle behavior. Society for Range Management. February, 2019.
  • Valencia MC, Nelson SV, Lawrence R, Hansen NC, Madsen MD, Anderson VJ, Petersen SL, Hopkins BG. Phosphorus fertilizer and hydrogel for rangeland seedling success. ASA•CSSA International Annual Meeting. November, 2018.
  • Petersen SL, Burchfield D, Howell R. Application of technologies used to assess and monitor rangeland resources. Society for Range Management. November, 2018.
  • Burchfield D, Petersen SL. Forest stand assessment using small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS). Society of American Foresters. October, 2018.
  • Anderson N, Petersen SL, Anderson VJ, Johnson RL. Impacts on Native Pollinators in Response to Commercial Honey Bee Introductions. SER Europe Conference. September, 2018.
  • Sowards T, Aanderud ZT, Petersen SL, Clair SBS, Kitchen S, Roundy BA, Madsen MD. Efficacy of abscic acid in delaying germination of pseudoroegneria spicata to reduce seeding failure in sagebrush-steppe restoration efforts. National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration. August, 2018.
  • Gomez T, Schill S, Petersen SL, Excovar X. Modeling coastal vulnerability for insight into mangrove and coral reef conservation efforts in Cuba. International Marine Conservation Congress. June, 2018.
  • Gomez T, Schill S, Petersen SL, Excovar X. Modeling coastal vulnerability for insight into mangrove and coral reef conservation efforts in Cuba. Society for Conservation GIS annual symposium. May, 2018.
  • Petersen SL. Use of drone technology (remote sensing) in agricultural practices. BYU Agricultural Days Conference. February, 2018.
  • Gomez T, Petersen SL, Jensen RR, Morgan G, Burton R, Butterfield C. Society for Range Management. February, 2018.
  • Morgan G, Gomez T, Petersen SL, Jensen RR, Burton R, Butterfield C. Comparing different small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) for rangeland management. Society for Range Management. February, 2018.
  • Knighton L, Petersen SL, Collins GH. Hydrologic and biological response to restoration of anthropogenically-altered spring in the Great Basin. Society for Range Management. February, 2018.
  • Petersen SL, Gooch AJ, Collins GH, Eggett DL, Montague CA. Relationship between free-roaming horses and pronghorn populations in riparian areas of Northwestern Nevada. Society for Range Management. February, 2018.
  • Anderson N, Anderson VJ, Gomez T, Petersen SL. Use of drones for assessing flower cover in relation to bee densities in Utah. Society for Range Management. February, 2018.
  • Morris JR, Petersen SL, Madsen MD, McMillan BR. Immature seedling fate and growth dynamics of the native grass, elymus elymoides. 71st Annual Meeting for the Society for Range Management . January, 2018.
  • Petersen SL. Principles of Range Management related to free-roaming horse management. National Wild Horse and Burro Summit. 2017.
  • Petersen SL. Implementing geospatial technology to improve environmental conservation. GIS Day. November, 2017.
  • Petersen SL. Rangeland monitoring using very high resolution remote sensing. Utah Society for Range Management. November, 2017.
  • Morgan G, Gomez T, Jensen RR, Petersen SL. Comparison of Two sUAS to Map and Monitor Vegetation. Great Plains Rocky Mountain Region Annual Meeting. Small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) have proven useful to identify and map vegetation species, and researchers have many sUAS and sensors available for such studies This study compares two sUAS, the DJI Phantom 4 with a Sentera Single Sensor NDVI camera and 3DR Solo Quadcopter with Sony QX-1 RGB and NIR cameras, to determine which provides the most accurate data to create an orthomosaic that can then be processed to determine vegetation species and density Image data were acquired over basin and range sites just west of Elko, Nevada Missions were flown at 100 ft above ground level using automated flight paths, and individual images were processed into an orthomosaic using Pix4D software Processing the Phantom 4 data was more automated than processing 3DR Solo Data However, preliminary analysis suggests that there may be more spectral detail in the data acquired by the SONY QX-1 cameras flown on the 3DR Solo sUAS Using E-cognition software we will run object-based image analysis on the images and compare them to the manual classifications done on site The preliminary study suggests the two platforms are adequate to gather large amounts of data that can later be processed into orthomosaics and then analyzed However, due to its geolocation abilities, data collection and initial processing is simplified for images collected by the DJI Phantom 4 This may indicate the DJI Phantom 4 is best for quick processing and analysis while the 3DR Solo is better for in depth spectral analysis. October, 2017.
  • Gomez T, Schill S, Nunez F, Knowles J, Petersen SL. Planning for the future of the coastal communities of Cuba. XI International Convention on the Environment and Develolpment. July, 2017.
  • Knighton L, Petersen SL, Collins G. Restoration of anthropogenically altered springs in the Great Basin: giving water back to the desert. Society for Range Management Annual Conference. February, 2017.
  • Spendlove B, Petersen SL, Kitchen SG, Landeen M. Spatial and temporal patterns in fire occurrence across Great Basin ecosystems. Society for Range Management Annual Conference. February, 2017.
  • Morris J, Petersen SL, Madsen MD. Effects of soil type and precipitation on seedling demography of the native grass, Elymus Elymoides. Annual Meeting for the Society for Range Management. January, 2017.
  • Morris J, Madsen MD, Taylor J, Petersen SL, Lawrence C, Anderson VJ. Novel approach for improving rangeland seeding success with imazapic herbicide, cultivator sweeps, and a rangeland drill. Annual Meeting for the Society for Range Management. January, 2017.
  • Petersen SL. Utilizing geospatial technology to improve our understanding of Great Basin landscapes. GIS Day. November, 2016.
  • Petersen SL, Gooch AJ, Eggett DL, Montague CA. The impact of feral horses on pronghorn water use in the Great Basin. Utah Society for Range Management Annual Conference. November, 2016.
  • Kitchen SG, Petersen SL, Taylor GW, Page DH, Balzotti CS, Coleman CE. Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) historic fire regimes and future fire risk: a multi-scale assessment. Restoring the West Conference. Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva: GBBP) is an iconic species found in montane habitats of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau – a region in which wildfire severity and size have increased over the past 30 years Study objectives were to use multiple lines of evidence to – 1) reconstruct historic fire regime patterns across a range of sites, 2) quantify conifer succession on GBBP sites after stand-replacing fire and 3) assess GBBP wildfire-related risk under contemporary and future environmental conditions Results from 10 sites reveal that historical fires in GBBP were typically small and of mixed-severity, with moderate to long fire-free intervals Initial post-fire conifer recruitment for three fires was relatively rapid with GBBP dominant to subdominant Large size and high severity of recent fires in GBBP habitats suggest that contemporary and future fire risk may exceed historical conditions resulting in GBBP range contractions and possible localized extinctions. October, 2016.
  • Howell R, Petersen SL. Remote sensing of western juniper: a comparison of image classification techniques. Society for Conservation GIS Annual Conference. August, 2016.
  • Gomez T, Schill S, Knowles J, Nunez F, Petersen SL. Creating a conservation blueprint for Cuba. ESRI Users Conference. July, 2016.
  • Jackson MW, Petersen SL, Howell R. Spatial Bibliography for mapping research. ESRI Users Conference. July, 2016.
  • Petersen SL, Balzotti CS, Freese M. Assessing greater sage-grouse habitat use at multiple spatial scales using remote sensing and GIS. Society for Range Management Annual Conference. February, 2016.
  • Morris J, Petersen SL, Louhaichi M. Modelling the impact of climate change on native shrub community dynamics in the southern part of the Mediterranean Basin. Society for Range Management Annual Conference. February, 2016.
  • Landeen M, Petersen SL, Kitchen SG, Flinders LA. Post-fire seed production of mountain big sagebrush. Society for Range Management Annual Conference. February, 2016.
  • Boswell A, Petersen SL, Roundy BA, Jensen RR, Vernon J, Summers D. Rangeland monitoring using remote sensing: comparing field-based sampling and image analysis techniques. Society for Range Management Annual Conference. February, 2016.
  • Petersen SL. Reclamation of Arid Lands. 2015 Industry/Government Conference. July, 2015.
  • Petersen SL. Principles of Range Management. Rangeland Workshop. May, 2015.
  • Petersen SL. Rangeland Management and Restoration. Yinchuan Science Academy. May, 2015.
  • Petersen SL. Principles of Range Management and Grazing. Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. August, 2014.
  • Roundy DB, Hulet A, Bybee J, Roundy BA, Petersen SL. Estimating pinyon and juniper tree cover and biomass using NAIP imagery across Utah. Society for Range Management 67th Annual Meeting. February, 2014.
  • Petersen SL. Restoration of arid rangelands in Western North America. Revegetation techniques for Arid Lands. November, 2013.
  • Balzotti C, Petersen SL, Larsen RT, Foster R, Randall J, Power M. Ecological Modeling of greater sage-grouse habitat in Utah. Utah Chapter of the Wildlife Society. March, 2013.
  • Gooch AJ, Petersen SL, McMillan BR, Smith TS. Feral horse impacts on pronghorn use of watering holes on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. Society for Range Management. February, 2013.
  • Balzotti CC, Dennison P, Petersen SL, Larsen RT, Foster R, Power M. Sage-grouse habitat models for the state of Utah. Society for Range Management. February, 2013.
  • Petersen SL, Kitchen SG, Clair SBS. The influence of fire severity on ecological succession patterns within an aspen-conifer post-fire community. Society for Range Management. February, 2013.
  • Hulet A, Roundy BA, Petersen SL. Utilizing NAIP imagery to estimate tree cover and biomass in pinyon and juniper woodlands. Society for Range Management 66th Annual Meeting. February, 2013.
  • Gooch A, Petersen SL, Smith TS, McMillan BR. Feral horse impacts on pronghorn use of watering holes on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. 2012 Annual Meeting of the Utah Chapter of the Wildlife Society. 2012.
  • Petersen SL, Carr C, Collins G, Clark P, Johnson D, Boyd C, Davies K, Gooch A. Free-roaming horse distribution and habitat use patterns within riparian and upland areas in western North America. International Wild Equid Conference. Effective management of free-roaming horses on western North American rangelands requires an understanding of their influence on habitat structure and resilience Of particular interest to managers is the influence that horses have on critical or sensitive environments such as riparian and sagebrush ecosystems To effectively characterize this influence, methods are needed that detect horse occurrence and habitat use patterns temporally The purpose of this study is to quantify horse riparian habitat use patterns by measuring the distribution of free-roaming horses in northwestern USA To accomplish this, GPS collars were placed on free-roaming horses to collect coordinate positions of horse location These data could then be used to track movement patterns and to calculate travel rates and distances Additionally, five motion sensitive digital infrared cameras were placed along five riparian areas, programmed to take photographs of horses between April to October when habitat use is high These images were collected either at 15 minute timed intervals or from motion triggered events Preliminary results indicate that GPS collars can be used effectively and safely to track horse movement patterns Additionally, more frequent logging rates provided spatially explicit data in relation to horse location, direction, and rate of movement during day and night periods Photographs from remote cameras suggest that the amount of time horses spend in riparian areas increases as the summer progresses, likely associated with water availability Understanding movement patterns and the frequency and duration of free-roaming horse use in sensitive habitats can help managers predict where impacts may occur and to identify sites that require protection. September, 2012.
  • Nordquist MW, Petersen SL, Robinson TF, Collins G. Stable isotope diet reconstruction of feral horses (Equus caballus) on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, USA. International Wild Equid Conference. Feral horse management has become a subject of significant controversy in the United States This is because of differing opinions and minimal recent empirical data on feral horses In recent years, numbers of feral horses have increased due to governmental horse removal restrictions (specifically the Wild Horse and Burro Act of 1971) With increasing numbers of feral horses on rangelands, land managers are challenged with identifying the appropriate course of action for satisfying groups with differing opinions The purpose of this study is to characterize diet consumption through the use of stable isotope dietary analysis (δ15N and δ13C) We did this in order to measure the impact of feral horse forage consumption on rangelands and to propose strategies for improving habitat management and conservation We obtained tail hair isotopic values from tail hair removed while horses that were held in squeeze chutes following a roundup Resulting isotopic values were compared to plant isotopic values using plant samples obtained from the geographical areas as the horses in order to characterize diet Contribution of the various plant species to the tail hair mixture values was determined using the EPA program IsoSource© Initial analysis of tail hair isotopes demonstrated seasonal variation During summer months, shrubs (mostly Artemesia spp, and Purshia tridentate), Elymus elymoides, Juncus balticus, and Festuca idahoensis were the predominantly consumed vegetative species During fall months, Leymus cinereus and Juncus balticus played a more significant role in feral horse diet In the winter, shrubs were more heavily consumed along with Poa secunda Springtime showed a shift towards forb consumption Changes in seasonal consumption of forages are most likely linked to forage availability as well as equine preference We analyzed plant metrics (specifically biomass, abundance, and cover) to compare a site with horses present to a site where horses had been removed the previous year and found relatively few differences between the two sites With nearly all differences we found higher plant production (forage availability) on the site where horses were still present In riparian areas however, there was more vegetation (specifically Carex rossii, Juncus balticus, and Poa secunda) on the site where horses had been removed Within riparian areas, only Bromus tectorum (a plant not typically found in riparian areas but characteristic of degraded areas) showed significantly greater amounts of biomass on the site with horses present Knowledge of plant species consumption will allow land managers greater ability to make scientifically based decisions regarding feral horse population control which is important in determining appropriate management levels of populations. September, 2012.
  • Roundy BA, Hulet A, Petersen SL, Bunting S, Jensen RR. Assessing the relationship between remotely-sensed variables and field-based vegetation variables at multiple scales. Society for Range Management 65th Annual Meeting, 8 January-3 February 2012. February, 2012.
  • Carr C, Petersen SL, Bristow L, Johnson DE, Collins G, Clark P. Effect of GPS Collar Sampling Interval on Measures of Free-Roaming Horse Activity and Resource Use. Society for Range Management 65th Annual Meeting, 8 January-3 February 2012. February, 2012.
  • Landeen M, Petersen SL, Kitchen sG, Flinders LA. Estimating age of Mountain Big Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp vaseyana) Using Morphological Characteristics. Society for Range Management 65th Annual Meeting, 8 January-3 February 2012. February, 2012.
  • Gooch AJ, Petersen SL, Collins G, Smith TS, McMillan BR. Feral Horse (Equus caballus) Impacts on Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) Use of Watering Holes on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada. Society for Range Management 65th Annual Meeting, 8 January-3 February 2012. February, 2012.
  • Nordquist MW, Petersen SL, Robinson TF. Feral Horse Diet Selection and Forage Availability. Society for Range Management 65th Annual Meeting, 8 January-3 February 2012. February, 2012.
  • Davies K, Boyd C, Collins G, Petersen SL. Impacts of Feral Horse Use on Rangelands and Riparian Areas. Society for Range Management 65th Annual Meeting, 8 January-3 February 2012. February, 2012.
  • Boswell A, Petersen SL, Jensen RR, Summers D, Vernon J. Rangeland Monitoring Using Remote Sensing and GIS: A Case Study of Scale and Resolution in Measuring Plant Community Structure. Society for Range Management 65th Annual Meeting, 8 January-3 February 2012. February, 2012.
  • Petersen SL, Carr C, Collins G, Boyd C, Davies K, Gooch A. Wild Horse Habitat Use Patterns within Riparian Areas of Northwest Nevada. Society for Range Management 65th Annual Meeting, 8 January-3 February 2012. February, 2012.
  • Hulet A, Roundy BA, Petersen SL, Bunting S, Jensen RR. Object-oriented segmentation and classification of high resolution imagery evaluating fire carrying fuel variables of pinyon-juniper woodlands in the Great Basin. American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. 2011.
  • Hulet A, Roundy BA, Petersen SL, Bunting S, Jensen RR. Characterizing pinyon-juniper woodlands using high resolution imagery. SageSTEP Land Manager Workshop. 2011.
  • Carr C, Petersen SL, Johnson DE, Clark PE, Collins G. Using GPS technology to characterize free-roaming horse distribution and movement patterns in southeast Oregon . The Wildlife Society Annual conference. November, 2011.
  • Cline N, Deboodt T, Fischer M, Petersen SL. Classification and expansion detection of western juniper using historical aerial imagery. Society for Range Management. February, 2011.
  • Landeen ML, Petersen SL, Kitchen SG, Weisberg PJ, Reeves BA, Costa KA. Estimating seed production and plant age of mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp vaseyana). Society for Range Management. February, 2011.
  • Nordquist MW, Robinson TF, Petersen SL. Stable isotope diet reconstruction using tail hairs of feral horses on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. Society for Range Management. February, 2011.
  • hulet A, Roundy BA, Petersen SL, Bunting S, Jensen RR. Object-oriented segmentation and classification of high resolution imagery evaluating fire-carying variables of pinyon-juniper woodlands in the Great Basin. Society for Range Management 64th annual meeting. February, 2011.
  • Balzotti CS, Terry RE, Burnett R, Petersen SL. Modeling the Maize Agriculture Potential of Landforms in Tikal National Park, Guatemala. [Blank]. October, 2010.
  • Petersen SL. North American Wild Horse Habitat Use, Distribution, and Management Considerations. Wild Equid Conference. June, 2010.
  • Balzotti CS, Terry RE, Petersen SL, Jensen R. Modeling the maize agriculture potential of landforms in the Sierra del Lacondon and Tikal National Parks, Guatemala. Society for American Archaeology. May, 2010.
  • Petersen SL, Miller RF, Gregg ME, Yost A. Landscape Heterogeneity for Greater Sage-grouse in Sagebrush Dominated Ecosystems. Western Shrublands Symposium. May, 2010.
  • Petersen SL, Collins GE, Johnson DE, Clark PE, Wilson M. Use of GPS collars to monitor free-roaming horse behavior and movement patterns. Utah Section The Wildlife Society Meeting. March, 2010.
  • Nordquist MK, Robinson TF, Petersen SL, Collins G. Diet Reconstruction of Ferral Horses on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge using Stable Isotopes. Wildlife Society Regional Conference. March, 2010.
  • Petersen SL, Collins GH, Carr CA, Johnson DE, Clark PE. Monitoring free-roaming horse distribution patterns and habitat use with GPS technology. Society for Range Management. February, 2010.
  • Hulet A, Roundy BA, Petersen SL, Bunting S. Applying remote sensing and geographic informations systems technology to estimate tree, shrub, and intercanopy vegetation density and cover of piyon-juniper woodlands in the Great Basin. Society for Range Management annual meeting. February, 2010.
  • Madsen MB, Petersen SL, Roundy BA. Seed coating application of wetting agents on native grass seeds for improving post-fire restoration: greenhouse evaluation. Society for Range Management annual meeting. February, 2010.
  • Zvirzden D, Roundy BA, Madsen M, Petersen SL. Spatial distribution of post-fire water repellency: assessment of the Milford Flat fire. Society for Range Management annual meeting. February, 2010.
  • Nordquist MK, Robinson TF, Petersen SL, Collins G. Stable Isotope Diet Reconstruction of Ferral Horses on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. Society of Range Management. February, 2010.
  • Madsen MD, Petersen SL. Influence of Post-fire Soil Water Repellence and Simulated Rainfall Regimes on Revegetation Success. AGU Chapman Conference Examining Ecohydrological Feedbacks of Landscape Change Along Elevation Gradients in Semiarid Regions. 2009.
  • Madsen MD, Davis BD, Petersen SL, Zvirzdin DL. Comparison of pinyon and juniper cover and density measurements obtained through remotely sensed imagery and field based rangeland studies. Annual Meeting for the Society for Range Management. 2009.
  • Madsen MD, Petersen SL, Chandler DG. Postfire water repellency: extent, severity, and restoration within a pinyon-juniper ecosystem. International Association for Landscape Ecology. 2009.
  • Petersen SL, Carr CA, Collins G, Johnson DE. Spatial Distribution and Habitat Use of Wild Horses in the Intermountain West. Research scientists involved in projects at the Hart Mountain/Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. 2009.
  • Petersen SL. Plant Community Restoration in Western North America. Research staff, government officials. 2009.
  • Madsen MD, Petersen SL, Roundy BA, Taylor AG, Hopkins BG. Innovative Use of Seed Coating Technologies for the Restoration of Soil Wettability and Perennial Grasses on Burned Semi-Arid Rangelands. Society for Range Management. 2009.
  • Petersen SL, Yost A, Miller R, Gregg M. Predicting greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nesting habitat at multiple spatial scales in southeast Oregon. Society for Range Management. 2009.
  • Walker R, Haug A, Flinders LA, Black HL, JA, Petersen SL. The dark kangaroo mouse: Microdipodops megacephalus, an endemic species to North America. 62nd Annual Meeting, Society for Range Management. wwwsrmmeetingsorg/files/programguide09pdf. February, 2009.
  • Petersen SL, Yost AC, Gregg M, Miller RF. Predicting sage-grouse nesting habitat at multiple spatial scales. 26th Western Agencies Sage and Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse Workshop. 2008.
  • Petersen SL, Stringham TK. Resilience, Triggers, Feedbacks and Thresholds: A western juniper model. Society for Range Management annual international conference: Symposium: Resilience, Triggers, Feedbacks and Thresholds. 2008.
  • Madsen MD, Petersen SL, Roundy BA. Assessing post-fire hydrophobicity in juniper-dominated ecoystems. Utah Society for Range Management Annual Conference. 2008.
  • Petersen SL, Miller RF, Gregg M, Yost A. Characterization of sage-grouse nesting and brood-rearing habitats at broad spatial scales using remote sensing and GIS. 36th Annual Pacific Northwest Range Management Symposium: Sage-grouse and sagebrush steppe. 2007.
  • Petersen SL, Miller RF, Gregg M, Yost A. Heterogeneity of sage-grouse habitat: predicting nesting habitat at broad spatial scales. Sage-grouse habitat and management session of the Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest and SWS. 2007.
  • Petersen SL, Miller RF, Gregg MA, Yost A. Sage-grouse Habitat Assessment at the Landscape Scale. Society for Range Management. 2007.
  • Petersen SL. Spatial and temporal dynamics of plant and wildlife populations in the Intermountain West. Utah section of the Society for Range Management. 2007.
Steve Petersen