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Todd Robinson

Associate Professor
Plant & Wildlife Sciences

5110 LSB
Provo, UT 84602

Biography

Courses Taught

Winter 2019

  • PWS 270: Animal Husbandry Section 001
  • PWS 335: Comparative Animal Nutrition Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Undergraduate Seminar Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Seminar Section 001

Fall 2018

  • PWS 325: Fisheries & Wetlands Mgt Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Undergraduate Seminar Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Seminar Section 001

Spring 2018

  • PWS 699R: Master's Thesis Section 006

Winter 2018

  • PWS 270: Animal Husbandry Section 001
  • PWS 335: Comparative Animal Nutrition Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Mentored Learning Experience Section 004
  • PWS 598R: Adv Topics in PWS Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Seminar Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Master's Thesis Section 004

Professional Citizenship

  • Reviewer, Ad Hoc Reviewer, Plos One, 2017-09-01 - 2017-09-30 - Present
  • Committee/Council Member, Society of Range Management, 2017-09-01 - 2017-09-30 - Present
  • Reviewer, Ad Hoc Reviewer, Mountain Research and Development, 2017-07-01 - 2017-07-31 - Present
  • Reviewer, Ad Hoc Reviewer, Small Ruminant Nutrition, 2016-09-01 - 2016-09-30 - Present
  • Reviewer, Ad Hoc Reviewer, BMC Veterinary Research, 2016-01-01 - 2016-12-31 - Present
  • Editorial Review Board Member, Scientific World Journal, 2014-01-01 - 2014-01-31 - Present
  • Committee/Council Chair, Competition Committee, 1998-01-01 - 1998-12-31 - 2000-01-01 - 2000-12-31

Courses Taught

2020

  • PWS 598R: Section 007
  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 598R: Section 001
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 335 : Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Section 003
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001

2019

  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 335 : Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001

2018

  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 006
  • PWS 598R: Section 001
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 335 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 004
  • PWS 494R: Section 004
  • PWS 694R: Section 001

2017

  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 010
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001
  • PWS 598R: Section 007
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 335 : Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001

2016

  • PWS 598R: Section 005
  • PWS 155 : Section 001
  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 335 : Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001

2015

  • PWS 155 : Section 001
  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Section 11
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • NDFS 330 : Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Section 005
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001

2014

  • PWS 155 : Section 001
  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 694R: Section 001
  • PWS 491R: Section 001
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Section 006

2013

  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Section 012
  • PWS 494R: Section 013
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Section 007

2012

  • PWS 494R: Section 012
  • PDBIO 349R: Section 022
  • PDBIO 120 : Section 006
  • PDBIO 349R: Section 001
  • PDBIO 120 : Section 001
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 494R: Section 007

2011

  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 012
  • PDBIO 120 : Section 006
  • PWS 270 : Section 001

2010

  • PWS 699R: Section 012
  • PWS 699R: Section 004
  • BIO 100 : Section 005
  • PWS 494R: Section 014
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 004
  • PWS 697R: Section 001

2009

  • PWS 325 : Section 001
  • PWS 699R: Section 012
  • PWS 494R: Section 013
  • PWS 697R: Section 002
  • PWS 699R: Section 004
  • PWS 270 : Section 001
  • PWS 799R: Section 008
  • PWS 699R: Section 004
  • PWS 494R: Section 007
  • LFSCI 494R: Section 044

2008

  • PWS 699R: Section 013
  • PWS 494R: Section 015
  • BIO 100 : Section 015
  • BIO 100 : Section 017
  • BIO 100 : Section 022
  • BIOL 100 : Section 015
  • BIOL 100 : Section 017
  • BIOL 100 : Section 022
  • PWS 697R: Section 002
  • PAS 699R: Section 016
  • PAS 598R: Section 002
  • NDFS 330: Section 1
  • PAS 494R: Section 009
  • PAS 697R: Section 001

2007

  • PAS 598R: Section 003
  • BIOL 100 : Section 049
  • BIOL 100 : Section 050
  • PAS 697R: Section 002
  • BIOL 100 : Section 001
  • PAS 494R: Section 018
  • PAS 598R: Section 002
  • PAS 494R: Section 009
  • BIOL 494R: Section 045
  • BIOL 100 : Section 071
  • PAS 697R: Section 003

2006

  • PAS 598R: Section 005
  • PAS 699R: Section 007
  • PAS 494R: Section 008
  • INBIO 494R: Section 007
  • PAS 697R: Section 002
  • BIOL 100 : Section 004

2005

  • INBIO 494R: Section 007
  • BIOL 494R: Section 010
  • INBIO 485R: Section 002
  • IAS 397R: Section 016
  • BIOL 100 : Section 001
  • NDFS 330 : Section 001
  • BIOL 494R: Section 017
  • INBIO 494R: Section 010

2004

  • INBIO 485R: Section 001
  • INBIO 494R: Section 012
  • BIOL 100 : Section 001
  • INBIO 485R: Section 001
  • PAS 494R: Section 001
  • INBIO 494R: Section 008
  • INBIO 494R: Section 409

Publications

  • Carroll C, Olsen KD, Ricks NJ, Dill-McFarland KA, Suen G, Robinson TF, Chaston JM. January (1st Quarter/Winter) 18, 2019. Bacterial communities in the alpaca gastrointestinal tract vary with diet and body site .
  • Robinson TF, Wayment T, Jensen RP, Hine A. December, 2016. Digestion of Soybean Meal in Alpacas. 11th ed.
  • Stolworthy DK, Bowden AE, Roeder BL, Robinson TF, Holland JG, Christensen SL, Beatty AM, Bridgewater LC, Eggett DL, Wendel JD, et alJuly (3rd Quarter/Summer) 20, 2015. MRI evaluation of spontaneous intervertebral disc degeneration in the alpaca cervical spine. 12th ed.
  • Nilsen B, Johnston NP, Stevens N, Robinson TF. February 11, 2015. In Situ Digestion of Amaranth, Barley and Quinoa in Alpacas. Weinheim: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Robinson TF, Roeder BL. November 29, 2014. Serum and urine analyte comparison between llamas and alpacas fed three forages.
  • Oldham CL, Robinson TF, Hunter ZR, Taylor L, White J, Johnston NP. October (4th Quarter/Autumn), 2014. Volatile Fatty Acid Profile for Grass hay or Alfalfa Hay Fed to Alpacas (Vicugna pacos). 5th ed. Weinheim: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Stevens N, Robinson TF, Nilsen B, Johnston NP. September, 2014. In situ digestion of forages and grains in alpacas fed alfalfa and grass hay.
  • Fugal R, Robinson TF, Anderson VJ. October (4th Quarter/Autumn) 28, 2013. Effects of Supplementing a Low Quality Diet with Desert Shrub (Kochia prostrata) on Alpaca (Vicugna pacos) Nutritional Status. 10th ed. Bahaa El-Din Bastawy Mekki, editor. Shebastar: Global Researchers Journals.
  • Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Johnston NP. August, 2013. Nitrogen Balance and Blood Metabolites of Llama (Lama Glama) Fed Barley Hay Supplemented with Alfalfa and Quinoa Straw in Bolivia . 8th ed. Shabestar: Global Researchers Journals.
  • Robinson TF, Harris BW, Johnston NP. July (3rd Quarter/Summer), 2013. Initial Compartment 1 pH Response to Grain Supplementation in Alpacas (Vicugna pacos) Fed Alfalfa and Grass Hay. 7th ed. Shabestar: Global Researchers Journals.
  • Whitaker J, Robinson TF, Whiting J. July (3rd Quarter/Summer), 2008. Stable isotope analysis of Big Horn sheep feces and forage. T.S. Smith & J. Miller, editor. Cody, WY: NWSGC.
  • Davies HL, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Sharp ME, Johnston NP, Christensen AC. May, 2007. Plasma metabolites and nitrogen balance in Lama glama associated with forage quality at altitude.
  • Davies HL, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Sharp ME, Johnston NP, Christensen A, Schaalje GB. October (4th Quarter/Autumn), 2006. Digestibility, nitrogen balance, and blood metabolites in llama (lama glama) and alpaca (lama pacos) fed barley or barley alfalfa diets.
  • Robinson TF, Sponheimer M, Roeder BL, Passey B, Cerling TE, Dearing MD, Ehleringer JR. July (3rd Quarter/Summer), 2006. Digestibility and nitrogen retention in llamas and goats fed C3 grass, and C4 grass hays. 1-2nd ed.
  • Sponheimer M, Robinson TF, Cerling TE, Tegland L, Roeder BL, Ayliffe L, Dearing MD, Ehleringer JR. May, 2006. Turnover of stable carbon isotopes in the muscle, liver, and breath CO2 of alpacas (Lama pacos). 9th ed.
  • Passey BH, Robinson TF, Ayliffe LK, Cerling TE, Sponheimer M, Dearing MD, Roeder BL, Ehleringer JR. October (4th Quarter/Autumn), 2005. Carbon isotope fractionation between diet, breath CO2, and bioapatite in different mammals. 10th ed.
  • Passey BH, Cerling TE, Schuster GT, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Krueger SK. August, 2005. Inverse methods for estimating primary input signals from time-averaged intra-tooth isotope profiles. 16th ed.
  • Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Schaalje GB, Hammer JD, Burton S, Christensen MJ. May, 2005. Nitrogen balance and blood metabolites of alpaca (Lama pacos) fed three forages of different protein content. 2nd ed.
  • Codron D, Codron J, Sponheimer M, Lee-Thorp JA, Robinson TF, Grant CC, DeRuiter D. January (1st Quarter/Winter), 2005. Assessing diet in Savanna herbivores using stable carbon isotope ratios of faeces.
  • Sponheimer M, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Ayliffe L, Passey B, Cerling T, Dearing D, Ehleringer J. December, 2003. An Experimental Study of Nitrogen Flux in Llamas: Is 14N Preferentially Excreted?. 12th ed.
  • Richards MP, Fuller BT, Sponheimer M, Robinson TF, Ayliffe L. 2003. Sulphur isotope measurements in archaeological samples: some methodological considerations.
  • Burton S, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Johnston NP, Latorre EV, Reyes SB, Schaalje GB. May, 2003. Body condition and blood metabolite characteristics of alpaca (Lama pacos) dams three months prepartum and dams and crias three months postpartum. 2nd ed.

Presentations

  • Bowden JN, Bowden JA, Robinson TF, Price JC, Bowden AE. Metabolite and Protein Variation Between Healthy and Degraded Alpaca Cervical Discs Analyzed by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Correlated to MR Imaging. Annual Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society. February, 2019.
  • Carroll CK, Olsen KD, Robinson TF, Chaston JM. Dietary Effects Of Grass Hay And Alfalfa Hay On The Digestive Microbiome Of The Alpaca. ASAS/ASN Joint Symposium: Gut Microbiota, Diet and Health. July, 2016.
  • Carroll C, Olson KD, Chaston JM, Robinson TF. Dietary effects of grass hay and alfalfa hay on the digestive microbiome of the alpaca. Joint Annual Meeting. The purpose of this study is to identify the effects of a grass hay diet (GH) and an alfalfa hay diet (AH) on the digestive microbiome of the alpaca Ten adult male alpacas were randomly selected for the study and divided into two groups; each group was fed a different diet (GH or AH) for thirty days Both groups were fed once daily ad libitum At the end of the feeding period, digesta samples were taken from the frst stomach compartment (C1), duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and large intestine of each alpaca Bacterial DNA was isolated from each sample and sequenced to identify operational taxonomic units, or bacterial taxa All data were analyzed using QIIME software Comparisons of the microbial composition of samples from grass-fed and alfalfa-fed alpacas at each digestive tract sample site showed that the microbiome at any single body site differed with diet (P < 005) Among the differences noted in the microbiomes of alpacas fed AH include a shift toward a higher proportion of phylum Euryarchaeota and a lower proportion of phylum Actinobacteria in the duodenum, ileum, and jejunum; and a higher proportion of phylum Euryarchaeota with a lower proportion of phylum Bacteroidetes in the cecum and large intestine Analyses of the microbial composition of each body site revealed the presence of three different microbiomes per diet treatment group (P < 005); that of C1, the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), and the distal intestine (cecum and large intestine) The redominant phyla were Firmicutes (all sites), Bacteroidetes (C1, cecum, and large intestine), Actinobacteria (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), and Euryarchaeota (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) These data demonstrate that, in alpacas, forage type does affect the predominant microbes and though taxa are similar between tract sites, there are shifts in the populations. July, 2016.
  • Bridgewater LC, Christensen L, Stolworthy DK, Fullwood RA, Merrell TM, Holland JG, Harmon LM, Robinson TF, Bowden AE. Development of an alpaca disc culture system for the study of intervertebral disc degeneration. Second International Spine Research Symposium. November, 2013.
  • Christensen SL, Holland JG, Fullwood RA, Stolworthy DK, Bowden AE, Robinson TF, Bridgewater LC. Development of an alpaca disc culture system for the study of intervertebral disc degeneration. Emerging Ideas in Biomedical Research Conference. October, 2013.
  • Nordquist MW, Petersen SL, Robinson TF, Collins G. Stable isotope diet reconstruction of feral horses (Equus caballus) on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, USA. International Wild Equid Conference. Feral horse management has become a subject of significant controversy in the United States This is because of differing opinions and minimal recent empirical data on feral horses In recent years, numbers of feral horses have increased due to governmental horse removal restrictions (specifically the Wild Horse and Burro Act of 1971) With increasing numbers of feral horses on rangelands, land managers are challenged with identifying the appropriate course of action for satisfying groups with differing opinions The purpose of this study is to characterize diet consumption through the use of stable isotope dietary analysis (δ15N and δ13C) We did this in order to measure the impact of feral horse forage consumption on rangelands and to propose strategies for improving habitat management and conservation We obtained tail hair isotopic values from tail hair removed while horses that were held in squeeze chutes following a roundup Resulting isotopic values were compared to plant isotopic values using plant samples obtained from the geographical areas as the horses in order to characterize diet Contribution of the various plant species to the tail hair mixture values was determined using the EPA program IsoSource© Initial analysis of tail hair isotopes demonstrated seasonal variation During summer months, shrubs (mostly Artemesia spp, and Purshia tridentate), Elymus elymoides, Juncus balticus, and Festuca idahoensis were the predominantly consumed vegetative species During fall months, Leymus cinereus and Juncus balticus played a more significant role in feral horse diet In the winter, shrubs were more heavily consumed along with Poa secunda Springtime showed a shift towards forb consumption Changes in seasonal consumption of forages are most likely linked to forage availability as well as equine preference We analyzed plant metrics (specifically biomass, abundance, and cover) to compare a site with horses present to a site where horses had been removed the previous year and found relatively few differences between the two sites With nearly all differences we found higher plant production (forage availability) on the site where horses were still present In riparian areas however, there was more vegetation (specifically Carex rossii, Juncus balticus, and Poa secunda) on the site where horses had been removed Within riparian areas, only Bromus tectorum (a plant not typically found in riparian areas but characteristic of degraded areas) showed significantly greater amounts of biomass on the site with horses present Knowledge of plant species consumption will allow land managers greater ability to make scientifically based decisions regarding feral horse population control which is important in determining appropriate management levels of populations. September, 2012.
  • Harris B, Robinson TF, Bott NI. Diurnal pH of the first compartment stomach of alpacas fed alfalfa or grass hay supplemented with oats, corn, and corn/oats/barley. Joint Animal and Dairy Science. July, 2012.
  • Nordquist MW, Petersen SL, Robinson TF. Feral Horse Diet Selection and Forage Availability. Society for Range Management 65th Annual Meeting, 8 January-3 February 2012. February, 2012.
  • Bott NI, Robinson TF, Merkley R, Tibary A. Preliminary results of estrous synchronization and timed artificial insemination in domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus). Annual Theriogenology Conference & Symposia. August, 2011.
  • Robinson TF. Diurnal pH and in vitro gas production of the first compartment stomach of alpacas fed grass hay, oats, COB and alfalfa. Experimental Biology. The purpose of this study was to determine the diurnal pH variation and in vitro gas production of the first compartment stomach (C1) of alpacas (vicugna pacos) fed grass hay and acute addition of grain supplements or alfalfa Three male (+3 yrs, 65 kg BW) were fitted with a C1 fistula, housed in metabolism crates and fed ad libitum grass hay and water The treatments (TRT) included the addition of 454 g of oats/molasses (O), corn/oats/ barley/molasses (COB) or alfalfa (ALF) to grass hay (GH) Each TRT was randomly administered to each alpaca so that each TRT was represented during each collection period A pH probe was calibrated, fitted through the fistula plug and positioned at the anterior, ventral portion of C1 one day prior to beginning of data collection Treatment periods included d1 to d14 acclimation period to GH, d14 to d18 diurnal pH collection for GH, d19 to d23 diurnal pH collection for each TRT In vitro gas production was determined in triplicate using the Ankom Gas Production System C1 fluid was obtained from the three alpacas during the GH period Diurnal patterns for a 24-hour period were an average of the 4-day collection period Dry matter intake was 1027, 690, 722 and 1150 for GH, O, COB and ALF, respectively Overall pH was different across the TRT was 668, 656, 634 and 654 (P<0001) for GH, O, COB and ALF, respectively Diurnal variations are presented in Figure 1 The phasic pattern for each TRT differed with the COB TRT being more dynamic and GH the least In vitro gas production was 495, 513, 678 and 390 ml/100mg substrate, respectively GH resulted in the highest pH and an intermediate gas production, while COB produced the greatest amount of gas and the lowest pH The alpaca C1 has a very effective buffering system, but acute intake of highly fermentable feeds does have a dramatic effect on pH Support was provided by Brigham Young University and The Camelid Center. April, 2011.
  • Nordquist MW, Robinson TF, Petersen SL. Stable isotope diet reconstruction using tail hairs of feral horses on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. Society for Range Management. February, 2011.
  • Nordquist MK, Robinson TF, Petersen SL, Collins G. Diet Reconstruction of Ferral Horses on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge using Stable Isotopes. Wildlife Society Regional Conference. March, 2010.
  • Nordquist MK, Robinson TF, Petersen SL, Collins G. Stable Isotope Diet Reconstruction of Ferral Horses on the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. Society of Range Management. February, 2010.
  • Stearns B, Robinson TF. Habitat, home range and diet reconstruction of wild Rio-Grande turkeys of Central Utah. National Wild Turkey Federation. 2008.
  • Whitaker J, Robinson TF, Whiting J. Stable isotope analysis of Big Horn sheep feces and forage. Nothern Wild Sheep and Goat Council; Biannual Symposium. 2008.
  • Passey BH, Robinson TF, Cerling TE, Singer JW. Cut-and-dried: Leaf water is the primary amplifier of an aridity signal in mammalian body water d18O. The 6th International Conference on Applications of Stable Isotope Techniques to Ecological Studies. 2008.
  • Whitaker J, Robinson TF. Diet reconstruction of Big Horn sheep. Utah Society of Range Management. 2008.
  • Stearns B, Robinson TF. Diet reconstruction of Wild Rio-Grande turkeys. Utah Society of Range Management. 2008.
  • Robinson TF, Raymer DL, Flinders JT. Wild Turkey Diet Reconstruction using Stable Isotope Techniques. National Wild Turkey Federation. 2005.
  • Roeder BL, Anderson J, Petersen A, Robinson TF. Affect of water deprivation on plasma and urine analytes of llamas. American Society of Animal Science and American Dairy Science Association Meetings. 2004.
  • Roeder BL, Sharp M, Horey C, Robinson TF. Serum and urine indice comparisons between llamas and alpacas fed three forages. American Society of Animal Science and American Dairy Science Association Meetings. 2004.
  • Teagland LD, Robinson TF, Sponheimer M, Roeder BL, Ayliffe L. Turnover of liver and muscle tissue determined by dietary stable isotope incorporation. Federation of American Society of Experimental Biology. 2003.
  • Steele FM, Cox A, Hope BJ, Robinson TF, Hawkins EW. Proximate analysis of meat from intact and castrate alpacas (Lama pacos) of varying age and feed regimen. Inst Food Technol Mtg. 2003.
  • Robinson TF. Invited to speak at the World Camelid Congress. World Camelid Congress. 2003.
  • Karren B, Robinson TF, Roeder BL. Changes in blood metabolites and electrolytes during gestation of goats and horses. 84th Annual Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases. November, 2003.
  • Sharp ME, Davies HL, Robinson TF, Roeder BL. Comparative study between llamas (Lama glama) and alpacas (Lama pacos) with respect to plasma metabolites, plasma electrolytes and nitrogen balance from two barley diets. 84th Annual Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases. November, 2003.
  • Davies HL, Sharp ME, Robinson TF, Roeder BL. Plasma metabolites and nitrogen balance changes in Lama glama due to forage quality at two different altitudes. 84th Annual Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases. November, 2003.
  • Moore LE, Teagland LD, Coaquira C, Robinson TF, Roeder BL. Plasma metabolites and nitrogen balance changes in Lama glama fed three different barley hay based diets. 84th Annual Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases. November, 2003.
  • Rinne K, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Griffiths T, Karren B. Blood and urine electrolyte and metabolite changes due to forage quality in alpaca and llama. 83rd Annual Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases. 2002.
  • Passey B, Cerling T, Ayliffe L, Sponheimer M, Hammer J, Robinson TF, Roeder BL. Seasonal Isotopic Data from Nebraska Fossil Horses and Insights from Developing Cow Molars Symposium on Incremental Growth. 62nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Meeting. 2001.
  • Ayliffe L, Cerling T, Passey B, Sponheimer M, Robinson TF, Hammer J, Baker S, Roeder BL. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Variations Recorded in the Tooth Enamel and Tissues of Modern Horses. 62nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Meeting. 2001.
  • Hammer JD, Robinson TF, Roeder BL. Acute and chronic effects of iv hypertonic saline solution and rehydration fluid on plasma electrolyte concentrations and renal function in Holstein steers. Am Assoc Bov Pract Conf. 2001.
  • Ayliffe L, Robinson TF, Hammer J, Roeder BL, Sponheimer M, Passey B, Cerling T, Dearing D, Ehleringer J. A Stable Isotope Study of Equus and Lama Digestive Physiology. Eighth International Theriological Congress. 2001.
  • Burton S, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Johnston NP, Latorre E, Reyes S. Body condition and blood metabolite characteristics of alpaca (Lama pacos) dams three months prepartum and of dam and cria three months postpartum. Federation of American Society of Experimental Biology. 2001.
  • Burton S, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Johnston NP, Latorre E, Reyes S. Body condition and blood metabolite characterization of alpaca (lama pacos) dams three months prepartum and of dam and cria three months postpartum. Federation of American Society of Experimental Biology. 2001.
  • Robinson TF, Jimenez L, Hammer JD, Burton S, Christensen M, Roeder BL. Nitrogen balance and blood metabolite of alpaca fed three forages of different protein content. Federation of American Society of Experimental Biology. 2001.
  • Hammer JD, Robinson TF, Roeder BL. The effect of intravenous hypertonic saline and method of transruminal rehydration using a dairy steer model. Federation of American Society of Experimental Biology. 2001.
  • Sponheimer M, Ayliffe L, Robinson TF, Passey B, Roeder BL, Jordan H, Cerling T, Ehleringer J, Dearing D. Feed, Fur, Fauna & Feces: A Preliminary Report on the SIB Project. Sixth Advanced Seminar on Paleodiet. 2001.
  • Ayliffe L, Cerling T, Passey B, Sponheimer M, Robinson TF, Hammer J, Roeder BL, Baker S. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Variations Recorded in the Tooth Enamel and Tissues of Modern Horses. Symposium on Incremental Growth, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Meeting. 2001.
  • Sponheimer M, West A, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Ayliffe L, Passey B, Cerling T, Ehleringer J, Dearing D. Mammalian Evolution and Biodiversity in a C4 World. Symposium on the History of Atmospheric CO2 and its Impacts on Plants, Animals, and Ecosystems. 2001.
  • Sponheimer M, West A, Lee-Throp J, Robinson TF. Tastes Good to Me: Antelopes and C4 Grasses. Symposium on the History of Atmospheric CO2 and its Impacts on Plants, Animals, and Ecosystems. 2001.
  • Robinson TF, Kooyman DL, Roeder BL, Hammer JD, Nelson MJ. Effects of varying dietary lysine and threonine on growth of the male and female mouse. 2000.
  • Roeder BL, Hammer J, Robinson TF, Bingham W. Effect of Intravenous Hypertonic Saline and Method of Transruminal Rehydration in Mastitic Dairy Cows. 80th Annual Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases. 1999.
  • Hammer JD, Robinson TF, Roeder BL, Bingham WW. Effect of intervaneous hypertonic saline and method of transruminal rehydration in mastitic dairy cows. Eightieth Ann Mtg CRWAD. 1999.
  • Robinson TF, Burton S, Dunn D. Animal production in the United States Presented to Agricultural Students at the Universiti de Magellanes. Punta Arenas, Chile. 1999.
Todd Robinson